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How primary teachers use games to support their teaching of mathematics

Russo, James, Bragg, Leicha A. and Russo, Toby 2021, How primary teachers use games to support their teaching of mathematics, lnternational electronic journal of elementary education, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 407-419, doi: 10.26822/iejee.2021.200.

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Title How primary teachers use games to support their teaching of mathematics
Author(s) Russo, James
Bragg, Leicha A.ORCID iD for Bragg, Leicha A. orcid.org/0000-0003-0579-4244
Russo, Toby
Journal name lnternational electronic journal of elementary education
Volume number 13
Issue number 4
Start page 407
End page 419
Total pages 13
Publisher lnternational Electronic Journal of Elementary Education
Place of publication Kutahya, Turkey
Publication date 2021-03
ISSN 1307-9298
Keyword(s) Games
Teacher Perspectives
Pedagogical Approaches
Student Engagement
Mathematics Education
Summary Mathematical games are widely employed by Australian primary school teachers to support mathematics instruction. Despite broad usage, prior research has not focused on the how and why games are employed from a teacher perspective. Australian primary school teachers (n = 248) completed a questionnaire designed to probe their experience with mathematical games in the classroom, specifically; motivation for and frequency of game usage, game execution within lesson routines and structures, and, perceptions of the efficacy of games to achieve pedagogical objectives. Almost all the primary teachers self-reported playing mathematical games in their classrooms a minimum of once a week. Games were utilised in differing pedagogical capacities, for example, as a ‘warm-up’ exercise, to introduce new mathematical concepts, to consolidate skills and knowledge, and for fluency practice. Consistent with prior research, teachers viewed games as highly effective for engaging students in mathematics. Teachers also viewed games as being effective for developing all four proficiencies highlighted in the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics (ACARA, 2019); fluency, understanding, problem-solving, and reasoning. Interestingly, despite the burgeoning use of digital games, only two out of the 248 teachers surveyed mentioned a computer game or digital application as their favourite game to use in a mathematics lesson. A substantial majority of teachers nominated favourite games that involved minimal or no materials, in particular, playing cards and/ or dice, pen and paper, and oral games. Implications of these findings are discussed and future research directions are recommended. This study has taken steps towards deepening our mathematics educational community’s understanding of primary teachers’ use and experience of games.
Language eng
DOI 10.26822/iejee.2021.200
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 130208 Mathematics and Numeracy Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 930202 Teacher and Instructor Development
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150385

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Education
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.