Examining the role of specialist palliative care in geriatric care to inform collaborations: A survey on the knowledge, practice and attitudes of Geriatricians in providing palliative care

Runacres, F, Poon, P, King, S, Lustig, J and Ugalde, Anna 2021, Examining the role of specialist palliative care in geriatric care to inform collaborations: A survey on the knowledge, practice and attitudes of Geriatricians in providing palliative care, AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING, vol. 40, pp. 33-33, doi: 10.1093/ageing/afab058.

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Title Examining the role of specialist palliative care in geriatric care to inform collaborations: A survey on the knowledge, practice and attitudes of Geriatricians in providing palliative care
Author(s) Runacres, F
Poon, P
King, S
Lustig, J
Ugalde, AnnaORCID iD for Ugalde, Anna orcid.org/0000-0002-2473-8435
Journal name AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING
Volume number 40
Start page 33
End page 33
Total pages 1
Publisher WILEY
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021-04-09
ISSN 1440-6381
1741-6612
Keyword(s) Geriatrics & Gerontology
Gerontology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Science & Technology
geriatric medicine
health services
knowledge
older adults
palliative care
palliative medicine
qualitative research
survey
Summary Background The global population is ageing, and rates of multimorbidity and chronic illness are rapidly rising. Given specialist palliative care has been shown to improve overall care and reduce health care costs, how best to provide this care to older people is internationally significant. Aim To examine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of geriatricians in providing palliative care and working with specialist palliative care services. We also aimed to capture self-reported barriers, confidence and satisfaction in providing palliative care. Design A prospective cross-sectional study surveying Australasian geriatricians was conducted. Setting/Participants This was a voluntary anonymous online survey, distributed to all full members of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Geriatric Medicine. Results A total of 168 completed responses were received; 58.3% were female and 36.6% had over 20 years of clinical experience. Most geriatricians (85%) reported caring for patients in their last 12 months of life represented a substantial aspect or most of their practice. Geriatricians overwhelmingly believed they should coordinate care (84%) and derived satisfaction from providing palliative care (95%). The majority (69%) believed all patients with advanced illness should receive concurrent specialist palliative care. Regarding knowledge, participants scored an average of 13.5 correct answers out of 18 in a Modified Palliative Care Knowledge Test. Conclusions Geriatricians find reward in providing generalist palliative care to their patients; however, potential exists for improved collaborations with specialist palliative care services. An evidence base for geriatric patients who benefit most from specialist palliative care services is needed to improve resourcing, collaborative practice and ultimately palliative care delivery.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/ageing/afab058
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
16 Studies in Human Society
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category CN Other journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150389

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
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