Protein Intake from Birth to 2 Years and Obesity Outcomes in Later Childhood and Adolescence: A Systematic Review of Prospective Cohort Studies

Stokes, A, Campbell, Karen, Yu, H-J, Szymlek-Gay, Ewa, Abbott, Gavin, He, Q-Q and Zheng, Miaobing 2021, Protein Intake from Birth to 2 Years and Obesity Outcomes in Later Childhood and Adolescence: A Systematic Review of Prospective Cohort Studies, Advances in Nutrition, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1093/advances/nmab034.

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Title Protein Intake from Birth to 2 Years and Obesity Outcomes in Later Childhood and Adolescence: A Systematic Review of Prospective Cohort Studies
Author(s) Stokes, A
Campbell, KarenORCID iD for Campbell, Karen orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Yu, H-J
Szymlek-Gay, EwaORCID iD for Szymlek-Gay, Ewa orcid.org/0000-0002-6533-7945
Abbott, GavinORCID iD for Abbott, Gavin orcid.org/0000-0003-4014-0705
He, Q-Q
Zheng, MiaobingORCID iD for Zheng, Miaobing orcid.org/0000-0002-4151-3502
Journal name Advances in Nutrition
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2021-04-27
ISSN 2161-8313
2156-5376
Keyword(s) protein intake
protein sources
infancy
obesity
childhood
Summary ABSTRACT Emerging evidence shows an association between protein intake during infancy and later obesity risk, and that association may differ by protein sources. This systematic review summarized and evaluated prospective cohort studies assessing the long-term association of total protein intake and protein sources during infancy (from birth to 2 y) with subsequent obesity outcomes in childhood or adolescence. Literature searches were conducted in Embase, Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science. Sixteen studies that reported associations between total protein intake and/or protein intake from different sources from birth to 2 y and ≥1 obesity outcomes in childhood or adolescence from 9 cohorts were identified. Most studies (11/16) were rated as high quality. The most frequently reported association was total protein intake and BMI (up to 10 y) with 6 out of 7 cohorts showing significant positive associations. Similar associations were found for animal protein, but not for plant protein. Limited studies examined the association between protein intake (both total and sources) and body composition (body fat, fat mass, and fat-free mass) and revealed inconsistent findings. Overall, higher intakes of total and animal protein during infancy were associated with higher BMI in childhood and adolescence. Future studies investigating the contribution of protein sources in long-term obesity development are needed. This review was registered at PROSPERO as CRD42020166540.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/advances/nmab034
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150605

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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