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Food insecurity and dietary intake among rural indian women: An exploratory study

Sims, Alice, van der Pligt, Paige, John, Preethi, Kaushal, Jyotsna, Kaur, Gaganjot and McKay, Fiona 2021, Food insecurity and dietary intake among rural indian women: An exploratory study, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 18, no. 9, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3390/ijerph18094851.

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Title Food insecurity and dietary intake among rural indian women: An exploratory study
Author(s) Sims, Alice
van der Pligt, PaigeORCID iD for van der Pligt, Paige orcid.org/0000-0003-4391-9431
John, Preethi
Kaushal, Jyotsna
Kaur, Gaganjot
McKay, FionaORCID iD for McKay, Fiona orcid.org/0000-0002-0498-3572
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 18
Issue number 9
Article ID 4851
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-05
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) AGRICULTURE
BURDEN
Environmental Sciences
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
food security
India
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
MALNUTRITION
NONCOMMUNICABLE DISEASES
NUTRITION
OBESITY
POVERTY
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
rural
Science & Technology
SECURITY
women
Summary Food insecurity is an important contributor to health and a factor in both underweight and malnutrition, and overweight and obesity. Countries where both undernutrition and overweight and obesity coexist are said to be experiencing a double burden of malnutrition. India is one example of a country experiencing this double burden. Women have been found to experience the negative impacts of food insecurity and obesity, however, the reasons that women experience the impact of malnutrition more so than men are complex and are under-researched. This current research employed a mixed methods approach to begin to fill this gap by exploring the dietary intake, anthropometric characteristics, and food security status of rural Indian women. In total, 78 household were surveyed. The average waist measurement, waist to hip ratio, and BMI were all above WHO recommendations, with two thirds of participants categorized as obese. Contributing to these findings was a very limited diet, high in energy, and low in protein and iron. The findings of this research suggest that the rural Indian women in this study have a lack of diet diversity and may be at risk of a range of non-communicable diseases.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18094851
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150623

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.