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Nature and type of patient-reported safety incidents in primary care: cross-sectional survey of patients from Australia and England

Hernan, Andrea, Giles, Sally J, Carson-Stevens, Andrew, Morgan, Mark, Lewis, Penny, Hind, James and Versace, Vincent 2021, Nature and type of patient-reported safety incidents in primary care: cross-sectional survey of patients from Australia and England, BMJ Open, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-042551.

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Title Nature and type of patient-reported safety incidents in primary care: cross-sectional survey of patients from Australia and England
Author(s) Hernan, AndreaORCID iD for Hernan, Andrea orcid.org/0000-0003-4542-1186
Giles, Sally J
Carson-Stevens, Andrew
Morgan, Mark
Lewis, Penny
Hind, James
Versace, VincentORCID iD for Versace, Vincent orcid.org/0000-0002-8514-1763
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 11
Issue number 4
Article ID e042551
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BMJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021-04
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) health & safety
health services administration & management
primary care
Summary Background
Patient engagement in safety has shown positive effects in preventing or reducing adverse events and potential safety risks. Capturing and utilising patient-reported safety incident data can be used for service learning and improvement.
Objective
The aim of this study was to characterise the nature of patient-reported safety incidents in primary care.
Design
Secondary analysis of two cross sectional studies.
Participants
Adult patients from Australian and English primary care settings.
Measures
Patients' self-reported experiences of safety incidents were captured using the validated Primary Care Patient Measure of Safety questionnaire. Qualitative responses to survey items were analysed and categorised using the Primary Care Patient Safety Classification System. The frequency and type of safety incidents, contributory factors, and patient and system level outcomes are presented.
Results
A total of 1329 patients (n=490, England; n=839, Australia) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 5.3% (n=69) of patients reported a safety incident over the preceding 12 months. The most common incident types were administration incidents (n=27, 31%) (mainly delays in accessing a physician) and incidents involving diagnosis and assessment (n=16, 18.4%). Organisation of care accounted for 27.6% (n=29) of the contributory factors identified in the safety incidents. Staff factors (n=13, 12.4%) was the second most commonly reported contributory factor. Where an outcome could be determined, patient inconvenience (n=24, 28.6%) and clinical harm (n=21, 25%) (psychological distress and unpleasant experience) were the most frequent.
Conclusions
The nature and outcomes of patient-reported incidents differ markedly from those identified in studies of staff-reported incidents. The findings from this study emphasise the importance of capturing patient-reported safety incidents in the primary care setting. The patient perspective can complement existing sources of safety intelligence with the potential for service improvement.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-042551
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150645

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.