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The reality of at risk mental state services: a response to recent criticisms

Yung, Alison R., Wood, S J, Malla, A, Nelson, B, McGorry, P and Shah, J 2021, The reality of at risk mental state services: a response to recent criticisms, Psychological medicine, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 212-218, doi: 10.1017/S003329171900299X.

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Title The reality of at risk mental state services: a response to recent criticisms
Author(s) Yung, Alison R.
Wood, S J
Malla, A
Nelson, B
McGorry, P
Shah, J
Journal name Psychological medicine
Volume number 51
Issue number 2
Start page 212
End page 218
Total pages 7
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 0033-2917
1469-8978
Keyword(s) At risk mental state
clinical high risk
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
prodromal
Psychiatry
Psychology
Psychology, Clinical
psychosis
schizophrenia
Science & Technology
Social Sciences
ultra high risk
Summary Background
In the 1990s criteria were developed to detect individuals at high and imminent risk of developing a psychotic disorder. These are known as the at risk mental state, ultra high risk or clinical high risk criteria. Individuals meeting these criteria are symptomatic and help-seeking. Services for such individuals are now found worldwide. Recently Psychological Medicine published two articles that criticise these services and suggest that they should be dismantled or restructured. One paper also provides recommendations on how ARMS services should be operate.
Methods
In this paper we draw on the existing literature in the field and present the perspective of some ARMS clinicians and researchers.
Results
Many of the critics' arguments are refuted. Most of the recommendations included in the Moritz et al. paper are already occurring.
Conclusions
ARMS services provide management of current problems, treatment to reduce risk of onset of psychotic disorder and monitoring of mental state, including attenuated psychotic symptoms. These symptoms are associated with a range of poor outcomes. It is important to assess them and track their trajectory over time. A new approach to detection of ARMS individuals can be considered that harnesses broad youth mental health services, such as headspace in Australia, Jigsaw in Ireland and ACCESS Open Minds in Canada. Attention should also be paid to the physical health of ARMS individuals. Far from needing to be dismantled we feel that the ARMS approach has much to offer to improve the health of young people.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S003329171900299X
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150776

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in TR Web of Science
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.