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Insects in the City: Does Remnant Native Habitat Influence Insect Order Distributions?

Shrestha, M, Garcia, JE, Thomas, F, Howard, Scarlett, Chua, JHJ, Tscheulin, T, Dorin, A, Nielsen, A and Dyer, AG 2021, Insects in the City: Does Remnant Native Habitat Influence Insect Order Distributions?, Diversity, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3390/d13040148.

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Title Insects in the City: Does Remnant Native Habitat Influence Insect Order Distributions?
Author(s) Shrestha, M
Garcia, JE
Thomas, F
Howard, ScarlettORCID iD for Howard, Scarlett orcid.org/0000-0002-1895-5409
Chua, JHJ
Tscheulin, T
Dorin, A
Nielsen, A
Dyer, AG
Journal name Diversity
Volume number 13
Issue number 4
Article ID 148
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-03-30
ISSN 1424-2818
Keyword(s) habitat fragmentation
ecosystem health
insects
native plants
urban growth
Summary There is increasing interest in developing urban design principles that incorporate good ecological management. Research on understanding the distribution and role of beneficial pollinating insects, in particular, is changing our view of the ecological value of cities. With the rapid expansion of the built environment comes a need to understand how insects may be affected in extensive urban areas. We therefore investigated insect pollinator capture rates in a rapidly growing and densely urbanized city (Melbourne, Australia). We identified a remnant native habitat contained within the expansive urban boundary, and established study sites at two nearby populated urban areas. We employed standard pan trap sampling techniques to passively sample insect orders in the different environments. Our results show that, even though the types of taxonomic groups of insects captured are comparable between locations, important pollinators like bees and hoverflies were more frequently captured in the remnant native habitat. By contrast, beetles (Coleoptera) and butterflies/moths (Lepidoptera) were more frequently observed in the urban residential regions. Our results suggest that the maintenance of native habitat zones within cities is likely to be valuable for the conservation of bees and the ecosystem services they provide.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/d13040148
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0301 Analytical Chemistry
0805 Distributed Computing
0906 Electrical and Electronic Engineering
0502 Environmental Science and Management
0602 Ecology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150907

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.