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Motivating factors and barriers towards exercise in severe mental illness: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Firth, J, Rosenbaum, S, Stubbs, B, Gorczynski, P, Yung, A R and Vancampfort, D 2016, Motivating factors and barriers towards exercise in severe mental illness: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Psychological medicine, vol. 46, no. 14, pp. 2869-2881, doi: 10.1017/S0033291716001732.


Title Motivating factors and barriers towards exercise in severe mental illness: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Firth, J
Rosenbaum, S
Stubbs, B
Gorczynski, P
Yung, A R
Vancampfort, D
Journal name Psychological medicine
Volume number 46
Issue number 14
Start page 2869
End page 2881
Total pages 13
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2016-10
ISSN 0033-2917
1469-8978
Keyword(s) BIPOLAR DISORDER
CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS
Exercise
HEALTH
INDIVIDUALS
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
PEOPLE
PERCEIVED BARRIERS
physical activity
physical health
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY INTERVENTIONS
PREFERENCES
Psychiatry
Psychology
Psychology, Clinical
psychosis
schizophrenia
Science & Technology
Social Sciences
WEIGHT-LOSS
Summary Exercise can improve clinical outcomes in people with severe mental illness (SMI). However, this population typically engages in low levels of physical activity with poor adherence to exercise interventions. Understanding the motivating factors and barriers towards exercise for people with SMI would help to maximize exercise participation. A search of major electronic databases was conducted from inception until May 2016. Quantitative studies providing proportional data on the motivating factors and/or barriers towards exercise among patients with SMI were eligible. Random-effects meta-analyses were undertaken to calculate proportional data and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for motivating factors and barriers toward exercise. From 1468 studies, 12 independent studies of 6431 psychiatric patients were eligible for inclusion. Meta-analyses showed that 91% of people with SMI endorsed ‘improving health’ as a reason for exercise (N = 6, n = 790, 95% CI 80–94). Among specific aspects of health and well-being, the most common motivations were ‘losing weight’ (83% of patients), ‘improving mood’ (81%) and ‘reducing stress’ (78%). However, low mood and stress were also identified as the most prevalent barriers towards exercise (61% of patients), followed by ‘lack of support’ (50%). Many of the desirable outcomes of exercise for people with SMI, such as mood improvement, stress reduction and increased energy, are inversely related to the barriers of depression, stress and fatigue which frequently restrict their participation in exercise. Providing patients with professional support to identify and achieve their exercise goals may enable them to overcome psychological barriers, and maintain motivation towards regular physical activity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0033291716001732
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30150924

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.