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Cognitive decline following psychosis onset: Data from the PACE clinic

Wood, SJ, Brewer, WJ, Koutsouradis, P, Phillips, LJ, Francey, SM, Proffitt, TM, Yung, Alison, Jackson, HJ, McGorry, PD and Pantelis, C 2007, Cognitive decline following psychosis onset: Data from the PACE clinic, British Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 191, no. SUPPL. 51, pp. S52-S57, doi: 10.1192/bjp.191.51.s52.


Title Cognitive decline following psychosis onset: Data from the PACE clinic
Author(s) Wood, SJ
Brewer, WJ
Koutsouradis, P
Phillips, LJ
Francey, SM
Proffitt, TM
Yung, Alison
Jackson, HJ
McGorry, PD
Pantelis, C
Journal name British Journal of Psychiatry
Volume number 191
Issue number SUPPL. 51
Start page S52
End page S57
Total pages 6
Publisher CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS
Place of publication Brisbane, AUSTRALIA
Publication date 2007-12-01
ISSN 0007-1250
1472-1465
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
ULTRA-HIGH-RISK
1ST-EPISODE SCHIZOPHRENIA
1ST EPISODE
PERFORMANCE
MEMORY
TIME
ABNORMALITIES
RISPERIDONE
PEOPLE
Summary BackgroundThe origin of cognitive impairments in psychotic disorders is still unclear. Although some deficits are apparent prior to the onset of frank illness, it is unknown if they progressAimsTo investigate whether cognitive function declined over the transition to psychosis in a group of ultra-high risk individualsMethodParticipants consisted of two groups: controls (n = 17) and individuals at ultra-high risk for development of psychosis (n = 16). Seven of the latter group later developed psychosis. Neuropsychological testing was conducted at baseline and again after at least a 12-month intervalResultsBoth the Visual Reproduction sub-test of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised and Trail-Making Test B showed a decline over the follow-up period that was specific to the group who became psychotic. In addition, both high-risk groups showed a decline in digit span performance. No other task showed significant change over timeConclusionsThese preliminary data suggest that as psychosis develops there may be a specific decline in visual memory and attentional set-shifting, reflecting impairments in efficient organisation of visual stimuli. This may be caused by either the illness itself or treatment with antipsychotic medication
Language eng
DOI 10.1192/bjp.191.51.s52
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category E3.1 Extract of paper
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151148

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.