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Patterns and predictors of sitting among women from disad-vantaged neighbourhoods over time: A 5-year prospective cohort study

Nayak, Minakshi, Wills, Karen, Teychenne, Megan, Salmon, Jo and Cleland, Verity 2021, Patterns and predictors of sitting among women from disad-vantaged neighbourhoods over time: A 5-year prospective cohort study, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 18, no. 9, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/ijerph18094625.

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Title Patterns and predictors of sitting among women from disad-vantaged neighbourhoods over time: A 5-year prospective cohort study
Author(s) Nayak, Minakshi
Wills, Karen
Teychenne, MeganORCID iD for Teychenne, Megan orcid.org/0000-0002-7293-8255
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Cleland, Verity
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 18
Issue number 9
Article ID 4625
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) low socioeconomic position
sedentary behaviour
sitting time
women
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
ADULTS
HEALTH
DETERMINANTS
WORK
MORTALITY
OBESITY
DISEASE
IMPACT
Summary Background: Our aim was to describe patterns of sitting over time and determine the sociodemographic predictors of sitting over time among women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Methods: Women age between 18 and 45 years (mean = 34.4 ±8.1, n = 4349) reported their sitting time, sociodemographic (e.g., age), and health (e.g., body mass index) three times over 5 years. Linear mixed modelling was used to determine the predictors of change in sitting over time, adjusting for covariates. Results: Mean baseline sitting time was 40.9 h/week, decreasing to 40.1 h/week over five years. Greater sitting time was reported in participants ≤25 years of age, living with obesity, living in urban areas, self-reported poor/fair health, working full-time, with higher education, never married and with no children. Annually, the average sitting time decreased by 0.4 h/week (95% CI; −0.7 to −0.05) in women working full-time but increased by 0.1 h/week (95% CI; −0.2 to 0.6) who were not working. Similarly, annual sitting time decreased by 0.6 h/week (95% CI; −0.2 to 1.3) in women with no children but increased by 0.4 h/week (95% CI; −0.2 to 0.5) and 0.9 h/week (95% CI; 0.3 to 1.3) among those with two and three/more children, respectively. Conclusion: Among disadvantaged women, those not working and with two or more children may be at particular risk for increased sitting time and warrant further attention.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18094625
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151338

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.