Who Did You Meet at the Venice Biennale? Education-to-Work Transition Enhancers for Aspiring Arts Professionals in Australia

Vincent, C, Glow, Hilary, Johanson, K and Coate, B 2021, Who Did You Meet at the Venice Biennale? Education-to-Work Transition Enhancers for Aspiring Arts Professionals in Australia, Work, Employment and Society, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.1177/09500170211004239.

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Title Who Did You Meet at the Venice Biennale? Education-to-Work Transition Enhancers for Aspiring Arts Professionals in Australia
Author(s) Vincent, C
Glow, HilaryORCID iD for Glow, Hilary orcid.org/0000-0001-9388-8317
Johanson, K
Coate, B
Journal name Work, Employment and Society
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher SAGE Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021-04-29
ISSN 0950-0170
1469-8722
Keyword(s) communities of practice
cultural and creative industries
education-to-work transition
networking
professional development
transition enhancers
Summary Precarious employment and unpaid labour are common features of the cultural and creative industries. While existing literature highlights the benefit of professional development in building careers, it focuses on self-driven rather than formalised activities. Social capital and social disadvantage are recognised as major factors limiting career success. Yet, it is unclear whether formalised professional development programs offer advantages to overcoming such barriers. This article examines a professional development scheme led by a government-funded cultural agency that provides cultural workers with opportunities to develop education-to-work ‘transition enhancers’. Using data from 45 participants in the Australia Council for the Arts’ Venice Biennale Professional Development Program, we find that the program enables access to three transition enhancers (professional experience, social connections and international experience). However, the program’s lack of structure ensures the benefits of participation are most effective for those who bring a proactive approach to engaging in events and building social relations.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/09500170211004239
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1402 Applied Economics
1503 Business and Management
1608 Sociology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151356

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
Department of Management
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