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Associations between nut intake, cognitive function and non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in older adults in the United States: NHANES 2011-14

Tan, Sze Yen, Georgousopoulou, E N, Cardoso, B R, Daly, Robin M and George, Elena S 2021, Associations between nut intake, cognitive function and non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in older adults in the United States: NHANES 2011-14, BMC geriatrics, vol. 21, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12877-021-02239-1.

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Title Associations between nut intake, cognitive function and non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in older adults in the United States: NHANES 2011-14
Author(s) Tan, Sze YenORCID iD for Tan, Sze Yen orcid.org/0000-0002-9607-202X
Georgousopoulou, E N
Cardoso, B R
Daly, Robin MORCID iD for Daly, Robin M orcid.org/0000-0002-9897-1598
George, Elena SORCID iD for George, Elena S orcid.org/0000-0002-1385-2371
Journal name BMC geriatrics
Volume number 21
Article ID 313
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1471-2318
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Geriatrics & Gerontology
Gerontology
Nuts
Older adults
Cognition
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Metabolic-associated fatty liver disease
Diet quality
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
MEDITERRANEAN DIET
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
WEIGHT-GAIN
FOOD-INTAKE
CONSUMPTION
HEALTH
INDEX
SUPPLEMENTATION
BENEFITS
Metabolic‐associated fatty liver disease
Non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease
Summary Background
Nuts are nutrient-rich and reported to provide some cognitive and cardiometabolic health benefits, but limited studies have focused on older adults. This study investigated the cross-sectional relationship between habitual nut intake, dietary pattern and quality, cognition and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in older adults.
Methods
Older adults (≥ 60 years) from the NHANES 2011-12 and 2013-14 cohorts, who had complete data on cognitive function (as CERAD total, delayed recall, animal fluency and digit-symbol substitution test) and variables to calculate the Fatty Liver Index (FLI), an indicator of NAFLD, were included (n = 1848). Nut intake and diet quality (Healthy Eating Index 2015) were determined using two 24-hour diet recalls. Participants were categorised into one of four groups based on their habitual nut intake: non-consumers (0 g/d), low intake (0.1–15.0 g/d), moderate intake (15.1–30.0 g/d) or met recommendation (> 30 g/d), with all outcomes compared between these nut intake groups.
Results
Cognitive scores of older adults were the lowest in non-consumers and significantly highest in the moderate intake group, with no further increase in those who consumed nuts more than 30 g/d (p < 0.007). FLI was the lowest among older adults with moderate nut intake but the associations disappeared after adjusting for covariates (p = 0.329). Moderate nut intake was also associated with better immediate and delayed memory in older adults with high risk of NAFLD (FLI ≥ 60) (B = 1.84 and 1.11, p < 0.05 respectively). Higher nutrient intake and better diet quality (p < 0.001) were seen with higher nut intake but did not influence energy from saturated fat intake. Factor analysis revealed ‘Nuts and oils’ as one of the four major dietary patterns associated with better cognition and lower FLI scores.
Conclusions
Moderate nut intake (15.1–30.0 g/d) may be sufficient for better cognitive performance, but not NAFLD risk of older adults in the US.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12877-021-02239-1
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2021, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151476

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.