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GamblingLess: A Randomised Trial Comparing Guided and Unguided Internet-Based Gambling Interventions

Dowling, Nicole, Merkouris, Stephanie, Rodda, S, Smith, D, Aarsman, Stephanie, Lavis, T, Lubman, DI, Austin, DW, Cunningham, JA, Battersby, MW and O, Seung-Chul 2021, GamblingLess: A Randomised Trial Comparing Guided and Unguided Internet-Based Gambling Interventions, Journal of Clinical Medicine, vol. 10, no. 11, pp. 1-26, doi: 10.3390/jcm10112224.

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Title GamblingLess: A Randomised Trial Comparing Guided and Unguided Internet-Based Gambling Interventions
Author(s) Dowling, NicoleORCID iD for Dowling, Nicole orcid.org/0000-0001-8592-2407
Merkouris, StephanieORCID iD for Merkouris, Stephanie orcid.org/0000-0001-9037-6121
Rodda, S
Smith, D
Aarsman, Stephanie
Lavis, T
Lubman, DI
Austin, DW
Cunningham, JA
Battersby, MW
O, Seung-Chul
Journal name Journal of Clinical Medicine
Volume number 10
Issue number 11
Article ID 2224
Start page 1
End page 26
Total pages 26
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2077-0383
Keyword(s) gambling
internet
online
intervention
treatment
cognitive-behavioural
CBT
self-help
self-directed
guidance
guided
unguided
Summary There is little evidence relating to the effects of adding guidance to internet-based gambling interventions. The primary aim was to compare the effectiveness of an online self-directed cognitive-behavioural gambling program (GamblingLess) with and without therapist-delivered guidance. It was hypothesised that, compared to the unguided intervention, the guided intervention would result in superior improvements in gambling symptom severity, urges, frequency, expenditure, psychological distress, quality of life and help-seeking. A two-arm, parallel-group, randomised trial with pragmatic features and three post-baseline evaluations (8 weeks, 12 weeks, 24 months) was conducted with 206 gamblers (106 unguided; 101 guided). Participants in both conditions reported significant improvements in gambling symptom severity, urges, frequency, expenditure, and psychological distress across the evaluation period, even after using intention-to-treat analyses and controlling for other low- and high-intensity help-seeking, as well as clinically significant changes in gambling symptom severity (69% recovered/improved). The guided intervention resulted in additional improvements to urges and frequency, within-group change in quality of life, and somewhat higher rates of clinically significant change (77% cf. 61%). These findings, which support the delivery of this intervention, suggest that guidance may offer some advantages but further research is required to establish when and for whom human support adds value.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/jcm10112224
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151582

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.