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Influences on physical activity and screen time amongst postpartum women with heightened depressive symptoms: a qualitative study

Apostolopoulos, Maria, Hnatiuk, Jill A., Maple, Jaimie-Lee, Olander, Ellinor K., Brennan, Leah, van der Pligt, Paige and Teychenne, Megan 2021, Influences on physical activity and screen time amongst postpartum women with heightened depressive symptoms: a qualitative study, BMC pregnancy and childbirth, vol. 21, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1186/s12884-021-03847-w.

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Title Influences on physical activity and screen time amongst postpartum women with heightened depressive symptoms: a qualitative study
Author(s) Apostolopoulos, Maria
Hnatiuk, Jill A.
Maple, Jaimie-Lee
Olander, Ellinor K.
Brennan, Leah
van der Pligt, PaigeORCID iD for van der Pligt, Paige orcid.org/0000-0003-4391-9431
Teychenne, MeganORCID iD for Teychenne, Megan orcid.org/0000-0002-7293-8255
Journal name BMC pregnancy and childbirth
Volume number 21
Article ID 376
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1471-2393
1471-2393
Keyword(s) ADULTS
ASSOCIATION
BARRIERS
depression
determinants
EXERCISE
HEALTH-BENEFITS
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
mental health
MOTHERS
Obstetrics & Gynecology
physical activity
postnatal
POSTNATAL DEPRESSION
Science & Technology
SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR
sedentary behaviour
SELF-EFFICACY
SOCIAL SUPPORT
strategies
Summary Background
Postpartum women are at higher risk of depression compared to the general population. Despite the mental health benefits an active lifestyle can provide, postpartum women engage in low physical activity and high screen time. Very little research has investigated the social ecological (i.e. individual, social and physical environmental) influences on physical activity and screen time amongst postpartum women, particularly amongst those with depressive symptoms. Therefore, this study sought to examine the influences on physical activity and screen time amongst postpartum women with heightened depressive symptoms.
Methods
20 mothers (3–9 months postpartum) participating in the Mums on the Move pilot randomised controlled trial who reported being insufficiently active and experiencing heightened depressive symptoms participated in semi-structured telephone interviews exploring their perceptions of the key influences on their physical activity and screen time across various levels of the social ecological model. Strategies for promoting physical activity and reducing screen time were explored with participants. Thematic analyses were undertaken to construct key themes from the qualitative data.
Results
Findings showed that postpartum women with depressive symptoms reported individual (i.e. sleep quality, being housebound, single income), social (i.e. childcare, social support from partner and friends) and physical environmental (i.e. weather, safety in the local neighbourhood) influences on physical activity. Postpartum women reported individual (i.e. screen use out of habit and addiction, enjoyment) and social (i.e. positive role modelling, social isolation) influences on screen-time, but no key themes targeting the physical environmental influences were identified for screen time. Strategies suggested by women to increase physical activity included mother’s physical activity groups, home-based physical activity programs and awareness-raising. Strategies to reduce screen time included the use of screen time tracker apps, increasing social connections and awareness-raising.
Conclusions
Amongst postpartum women with heightened depressive symptoms, influences on physical activity encompassed all constructs of the social ecological model. However, screen time was only perceived to be influenced by individual and social factors. Intervention strategies targeting predominantly individual and social factors may be particularly important for this high-risk group. These findings could assist in developing targeted physical activity and screen time interventions for this cohort.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12884-021-03847-w
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1110 Nursing
1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151584

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.