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LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS profiling and antioxidant activity of phenolics from custard apple fruit and by-products

Du, Junxi, Zhong, Biming, Subbiah, Vigasini, Barrow, Colin J, Dunshea, Frank R and Suleria, Hafiz AR 2021, LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS profiling and antioxidant activity of phenolics from custard apple fruit and by-products, Separations, vol. 8, no. 5, pp. 62-62, doi: 10.3390/separations8050062.

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Title LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS profiling and antioxidant activity of phenolics from custard apple fruit and by-products
Author(s) Du, Junxi
Zhong, Biming
Subbiah, Vigasini
Barrow, Colin JORCID iD for Barrow, Colin J orcid.org/0000-0002-2153-7267
Dunshea, Frank R
Suleria, Hafiz ARORCID iD for Suleria, Hafiz AR orcid.org/0000-0002-2450-0830
Journal name Separations
Volume number 8
Issue number 5
Start page 62
End page 62
Total pages 26
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-05
ISSN 2297-8739
Keyword(s) custard apple
phenolic compounds
antioxidant potential
LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS
HPLC-PDA
Summary Custard apple is an edible fruit grown in tropical and subtropical regions. Due to its abundant nutrient content and perceived health benefits, it is a popular food for consumption and is utilized as a medicinal aid. Although some published research had provided the phenolic compound of custard apple, the comprehensive phenolic profiling of Australian grown custard apple is limited. Hence, this research aimed to evaluate the phenolic content and antioxidant potential by various phenolic content and antioxidant assays, followed by characterization and quantification of the phenolic profile using LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS and HPLC-PDA. African Pride peel had the highest value in TPC (61.69 ± 1.48 mg GAE/g), TFC (0.42 ± 0.01 mg QE/g) and TTC (43.25 ± 6.70 mg CE/g), followed by Pink’s Mammoth peel (19.37 ± 1.48 mg GAE/g for TPC, 0.27 ± 0.03 mg QE/g for TFC and 10.25 ± 1.13 mg CE/g for TTC). African Pride peel also exhibited the highest antioxidant potential for TAC (43.41 ± 1.66 mg AAE/g), FRAP (3.60 ± 0.14 mg AAE/g) and ABTS (127.67 ± 4.60 mg AAE/g), whereas Pink’s Mammoth peel had the highest DPPH (16.09 ± 0.34 mg AAE/g), RPA (5.32 ± 0.14 mg AAE/g), •OH-RSA (1.23 ± 0.25 mg AAE/g) and FICA (3.17 ± 0.18 mg EDTA/g). LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS experiment successfully characterized 85 phenolic compounds in total, encompassing phenolic acids (20), flavonoids (42), stilbenes (4), lignans (6) and other polyphenols (13) in all three parts (pulp, peel and seeds) of custard apple. The phenolic compounds in different portions of custard apples were quantified by HPLC-PDA, and it was shown that African Pride peel had higher concentrations of the most abundant phenolics. This is the first study to provide the comprehensive phenolic profile of Australian grown custard apples, and the results highlight that each part of custard apple can be a rich source of phenolics for the utilization of custard apple fruit and waste in the food, animal feeding and nutraceutical industries.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/separations8050062
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0301 Analytical Chemistry
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151608

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.