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The role of boundary length and adjacent patch contrast in guppy mate choice

Sibeaux, Adelaide Marie Colette, Camduras, Thomas and Endler, John A 2021, The role of boundary length and adjacent patch contrast in guppy mate choice, Behavioral ecology, vol. 32, no. 1, Jan/Feb, pp. 30-40, doi: 10.1093/beheco/araa097.

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Title The role of boundary length and adjacent patch contrast in guppy mate choice
Author(s) Sibeaux, Adelaide Marie Colette
Camduras, Thomas
Endler, John AORCID iD for Endler, John A orcid.org/0000-0002-7557-7627
Journal name Behavioral ecology
Volume number 32
Issue number 1
Season Jan/Feb
Start page 30
End page 40
Total pages 11
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2021-01
ISSN 1045-2249
1465-7279
Keyword(s) animal color pattern
Behavioral Sciences
Biology
boundary strength analysis
color patch adjacency
Ecology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
mate choice
Science & Technology
signal amplifier
Zoology
Summary The presence of various combinations of adjacent colors within polymorphic species’ color pattern could have a major impact on mate choice. We studied the role of pattern geometry in predicting mate choice in guppies using boundary strength analysis (BSA). BSA estimates the visual contrast intensity between two adjacent color patches (ΔS) weighted by the lengths of the boundaries between these adjacent color patches. We measured both the chromatic (hue and saturation) and achromatic (luminance) ΔS for each pair of adjacent patches. For each male’s color pattern, we measured BSA as both mean (mΔS) and coefficient of variation (cvΔS) of all ΔS weighted by their corresponding boundary lengths. We also determined if specific color patch boundaries had an impact on female preferences and whether these predicted overall male contrast (mΔS). We found that males with a higher mΔS were more attractive to females and that six boundaries containing either fuzzy black or black as one of the pair colors significantly affected female preferences, indicating that 1) females favored highly conspicuous males and 2) melanin-based patches could be used as a signal amplifier, not only for orange but for other colors.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/beheco/araa097
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 0602 Ecology
0603 Evolutionary Biology
0608 Zoology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151623

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.