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Passive acoustic monitoring for detecting the Yellow-bellied Glider, a highly vocal arboreal Marsupial

Whisson, Desley, McKinnon, Freya, Lefoe, Matthew and Rendall, Anthony 2021, Passive acoustic monitoring for detecting the Yellow-bellied Glider, a highly vocal arboreal Marsupial, PLoS one, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0252092.

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Title Passive acoustic monitoring for detecting the Yellow-bellied Glider, a highly vocal arboreal Marsupial
Author(s) Whisson, DesleyORCID iD for Whisson, Desley orcid.org/0000-0002-4221-0706
McKinnon, Freya
Lefoe, Matthew
Rendall, AnthonyORCID iD for Rendall, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-7286-9288
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 16
Issue number 5
Article ID e0252092
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2021-05-25
ISSN 1932-6203
1932-6203
Keyword(s) vocalization
spring
sunset
ambient noise
survey methods
seasons
rain
wildlife
Summary Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) is increasingly being used for the survey of vocalising wildlife species that are otherwise cryptic and difficult to survey. Our study aimed to develop PAM guidelines for detecting the Yellow-bellied Glider, a highly vocal arboreal marsupial that occurs in native Eucalyptus forests in eastern and south-eastern Australia. To achieve this, we considered the influence of background noise, weather conditions, lunar illumination, time since sunset and season on the probability of detecting vocalisations. We deployed Autonomous Recording Units (ARUs) at 43 sites in the Central Highlands of Victoria during two periods: spring/summer (October 2018 to January 2019), and autumn/winter (May to August 2019). ARUs were programmed to record for 11 hours from sunset for 14 consecutive days during each period. Background noise resulted from inclement weather (wind and rain) and masked vocalisations in spectrograms of the recordings, thus having the greatest influence on detection probability. Vocalisations were most common in the four hours after sunset. Rainfall negatively influenced detection probability, especially during the autumn/winter sampling period. Detection of Yellow-bellied Gliders with PAM requires deploying ARUs programmed to record for four hours after sunset, for a minimum of six nights with minimal inclement weather (light or no wind or rain). The survey period should be extended to 12 nights when rain or wind are forecast. Because PAM is less labour intensive than active surveys (i.e., spotlighting and call playbacks with multiple observers and several nights’ survey per site), its use will facilitate broad-scale surveys for Yellow-bellied Gliders.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0252092
Indigenous content off
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151641

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.