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Muslim Community Organizations' Perceptions of Islamophobia: towards an informed countering response

Cheikh Husain, Sara 2020, Muslim Community Organizations' Perceptions of Islamophobia: towards an informed countering response, Religions, vol. 11, no. 10, pp. 1-24, doi: 10.3390/rel11100485.

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Title Muslim Community Organizations' Perceptions of Islamophobia: towards an informed countering response
Author(s) Cheikh Husain, Sara
Journal name Religions
Volume number 11
Issue number 10
Article ID 485
Start page 1
End page 24
Total pages 24
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2077-1444
Keyword(s) Arts & Humanities
AUSTRALIA
Australian Muslims
CITIZENSHIP
civil society
collective agency
INTEGRATIONISM
ISLAM
Islamophobia
Multiculturalism
POLITICS
positional practices
racism
Religion
SETTLEMENT
SOCIETY
Strong Structuration Theory
SUSPECT COMMUNITY
Summary During the past two decades, Muslim Community Organizations (MCOs) in the West have increasingly become stakeholders in the public debates and the national consultations regarding the Muslim communities. MCO’s perception of Islamophobia is critical for understanding their collective response to the problem. Much of the Australian literature, nonetheless, tends to subsume Islamophobia within the dynamics of exclusion/inclusion within a social cohesion paradigm, and primarily through a focus on individuals. This article aims to contribute to the existing literature through a deeper contextual understanding of Australian MCOs’ framing of and engagement with Islamophobia in its various manifestations, in order to better cognize its impact on their agentic capacity. Deploying an expanded theoretical framework of agency structure, this article analyzes 25 interviews with representatives of Victorian MCOs, to explore their perceptions of Islamophobia across multiple domains of power—the social, discursive and the political. MCOs’ perceptions of the problem impact their responding anti-Islamophobia civic–political engagements towards soft grassroots connections and Muslims’ empowerment. In light of the findings, the article points for the need to enhance building inter-community solidarity, utilize supportive institutional multicultural schemes and establish a separate Muslim advocacy organization.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/rel11100485
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 2204 Religion and Religious Studies
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151679

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.