Openly accessible

Evaluating OzHarvest’s primary-school Food Education and Sustainability Training (FEAST) program in 10–12-year-old children in Australia: protocol for a pragmatic cluster non-randomized controlled trial

Karpouzis, Fay, Lindberg, Rebecca, Walsh, A, Shah, S, Abbott, Gavin, Lai, J, Berner, A and Ball, Kylie 2021, Evaluating OzHarvest’s primary-school Food Education and Sustainability Training (FEAST) program in 10–12-year-old children in Australia: protocol for a pragmatic cluster non-randomized controlled trial, BMC public health, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1186/s12889-021-10302-0.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Evaluating OzHarvest’s primary-school Food Education and Sustainability Training (FEAST) program in 10–12-year-old children in Australia: protocol for a pragmatic cluster non-randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Karpouzis, Fay
Lindberg, Rebecca
Walsh, A
Shah, S
Abbott, GavinORCID iD for Abbott, Gavin orcid.org/0000-0003-4014-0705
Lai, J
Berner, A
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 21
Issue number 1
Article ID 967
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1471-2458
1471-2458
Keyword(s) BEHAVIORS
Children
Cluster non-randomized controlled trial
Cooking
Food waste
Fruit
HEALTH-PROMOTION
INTERVENTIONS
LIFE
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition
NUTRITION EDUCATION
Primary school
Process evaluation
PROMOTE FRUIT
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
RELIABILITY
Science & Technology
Sustainability
UNITED-STATES
Vegetable
VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION
Summary Background The promotion of healthy eating is a public health priority. Poor dietary behaviours, including low fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption are of particular concern among children. Novel nutrition promotion strategies are needed to improve F&V consumption. Sustainability education could be used to support nutrition education within the school context. The purpose of this paper is to report the protocol for impact and process evaluation of the school-based Food Education and Sustainability Training (FEAST) program, designed to educate children about sustainability, food waste and nutrition, using hands-on cooking activities. Methods A pragmatic, parallel, cluster non-randomized controlled trial with pre- and post-measures, will be implemented among 20 primary schools (10 intervention vs 10 wait-list-control) within NSW, Australia, involving children in Grades 5–6. FEAST is a curriculum-aligned program, delivered as a 1.5-h lesson/week, for a 10-week unit of inquiry, incorporating theory and cooking. FEAST was developed using theoretical frameworks which included Social Cognitive Theory and the Precede-Proceed Planning model. Primary outcomes include children’s self-reported F&V intakes (serves/day). Food literacy constructs such as: nutrition knowledge, food preparation and cooking skills, self-efficacy and behaviours, food waste knowledge and behaviours and food production knowledge, will be assessed as secondary outcomes. Process evaluation will assess program reach, adoption, implementation, maintenance, satisfaction and perceived benefits by teachers and students. An online survey (including quantitative and qualitative questions) was developed for administration at baseline (impact evaluation) and immediately post-intervention (impact and process evaluation). Intervention effects on quantitative study outcomes will be estimated with ​generalised linear mixed models, including random effects and will follow the intention-to-treat principles. Open-ended questions embedded within the surveys will be analysed qualitatively using content and thematic analyses. Discussion Results from this trial will provide valuable information on the value of adding environmental sustainability strategies to nutrition education in schools. Results will inform the design of future research and programs focused on primary-school children’s nutrition, sustainability-related behaviours and experiential school-based interventions. Trial registration Trial registered 14th December 2020 with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12620001347954).
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-021-10302-0
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID NHMRC 1191162
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151687

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 9 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 31 May 2021, 16:23:51 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.