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The impact of illness perceptions and coping strategies on use of supportive care for cancer

Stephenson, Peta, Yuen, Eva, Skaczkowski, Gemma, Spelten, Evelien R., Orbell, Sheina and Wilson, Carlene 2021, The impact of illness perceptions and coping strategies on use of supportive care for cancer, Cancers, vol. 13, no. 10, doi: 10.3390/cancers13102501.

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Title The impact of illness perceptions and coping strategies on use of supportive care for cancer
Author(s) Stephenson, Peta
Yuen, Eva
Skaczkowski, Gemma
Spelten, Evelien R.
Orbell, Sheina
Wilson, Carlene
Journal name Cancers
Volume number 13
Issue number 10
Article ID 2501
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2072-6694
2072-6694
Keyword(s) BRIEF-COPE
common sense model of self-regulation
COMMON-SENSE MODEL
coping
DISEASE
DISTRESS
HEALTH
HELP-SEEKING
illness perceptions
Leventhal
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
NEEDS
Oncology
oncology care
PREDICTORS
Science & Technology
SELF-REGULATION
supportive care
survivorship support programmes
UNDERSTAND
Summary Despite evidence that survivorship support programmes enhance physical and psychosocial wellbeing, cancer patients and survivors often do not use these supportive care services. This study investigated the utility of the Common Sense Model of Self-Regulation for predicting supportive care use following cancer, and the mediating role of coping strategies. Cancer patients and survivors (n = 336 from Australia, n = 61 from the UK; 191 males, 206 females) aged 20–83 years (Mean (M) = 62.73, Standard Deviation (SD) = 13.28) completed an online questionnaire. Predictor variables were cognitive and emotional representations of cancer, as measured by the Illness Perception Questionnaire—Revised (IPQ-R), and problem- and emotion-focused coping strategies, as measured by the Brief-Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced inventory (Brief-COPE). The outcome variable was survivorship support programme use within the preceding month. Perceived personal control over cancer predicted supportive care use, but cancer-related emotional distress did not. Coping was an inconsistent mediator of the relationships. Problem-focused coping mediated the relationship between personal control and supportive care use; emotion-focused coping did not mediate between emotional responses to cancer and the uptake of survivorship support programmes. The Common Sense Model provides a useful framework for understanding survivorship support programme use. However, more clarity around the relationship between illness beliefs and coping is required.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/cancers13102501
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151842

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.