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Sarcopenic characteristics of active older adults: a cross-sectional exploration

Huschtscha, Zoya, Parr, Alexandra, Porter, Judi and Costa, Ricardo J. S. 2021, Sarcopenic characteristics of active older adults: a cross-sectional exploration, Sports medicine - open, vol. 7, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1186/s40798-021-00323-9.

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Title Sarcopenic characteristics of active older adults: a cross-sectional exploration
Author(s) Huschtscha, Zoya
Parr, Alexandra
Porter, JudiORCID iD for Porter, Judi orcid.org/0000-0002-7535-1919
Costa, Ricardo J. S.
Journal name Sports medicine - open
Volume number 7
Article ID 32
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publication date 2021-12-01
ISSN 2199-1170
2198-9761
Keyword(s) AGE-ASSOCIATED CHANGES
Body composition
Cardiorespiratory
DECLINE
Exercise
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
MEN
PERFORMANCE
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
Power
Protein
PROTEIN-INTAKE
Science & Technology
SKELETAL-MUSCLE MASS
Sport Sciences
Strength
Summary Background
Ageing is associated with a decline in skeletal muscle mass and function (strength and power), known as sarcopenia. Inadequate dietary protein and inactivity have been shown to accelerate sarcopenia outcomes, occurring at different rates in males and females. Regardless, active older adults who often exceed the exercise guidelines still show signs of sarcopenia. This study aimed to explore the link between age, physical activity, protein intake, and biological sex with skeletal muscle mass, strength, power, and physical capacity/performance in active older adults. Fifty-four active older adults were recruited from this trial and grouped according to age (middle aged: 50–59 years, and older age: ≥ 60 years), exercise volume (low: ≥ 90–149 min/week, moderate: ≥ 150–299 min/week, and high: ≥ 300 min/week), protein intake (low: < 0.8 g/kg body mass (BM), moderate: ≥ 0.8–1.19g /kg BM, and high: ≥ 1.2 g/kg BM), and biological sex (males and females). Skeletal muscle and fat mass (dual X-ray absorptiometry), strength (1-repetition maximum using leg press, chest press, lateral pull down, and hand grip), power (counter movement jump), and general fitness (cardiorespiratory capacity and gait speed) were assessed. Data were grouped based on variables, and a general linear model (ANCOVA) or an independent t test was used to determine between group differences.
Results
Fifty three of the total participants’ data were analysed. The middle-aged group had 18%, 11%, and 10% higher leg press, chest press, and lateral pull down, respectively, compared to the older-aged group (p < .05). There were no significant differences between different levels of training volume and any of the outcomes. Higher protein intakes were associated with significantly less body fat mass (p = .005) and a trend towards a higher leg press (p = .053) and higher relative power (W/kg) (p = .056) compared with the moderate and low protein intake groups. Significant differences based on biological sex were observed for all outcomes except for gait speed (p = .611) and cardiorespiratory fitness (p = .147).
Conclusions
Contributions of age, physical activity, daily protein intake, and biological sex can explain the individual variation in outcomes related to changes in body composition, strength, power, and/or cardiorespiratory fitness in a cohort of active older adults.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s40798-021-00323-9
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30151983

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.