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Cationic polymer-in-salt electrolytes for fast metal ion conduction and solid-state battery applications

Chen, Fangfang, Wang, Xiaoen, Armand, Michel and Forsyth, Maria 2021, Cationic polymer-in-salt electrolytes for fast metal ion conduction and solid-state battery applications, [Unknown], pp. 1-14, doi: 10.21203/rs.3.rs-532893/v1.

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Title Cationic polymer-in-salt electrolytes for fast metal ion conduction and solid-state battery applications
Author(s) Chen, FangfangORCID iD for Chen, Fangfang orcid.org/0000-0002-8004-1720
Wang, XiaoenORCID iD for Wang, Xiaoen orcid.org/0000-0001-7713-7062
Armand, Michel
Forsyth, MariaORCID iD for Forsyth, Maria orcid.org/0000-0002-4273-8105
Journal name [Unknown]
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication [San Francisco, Calif.]
Publication date 2021-05-25
Keyword(s) batteries
engery devices
polymer electrolytes
Summary Polymer electrolytes provide a safe solution for all-solid-state high energy density batteries. Materials that meet the simultaneous requirement of high ionic conductivity and high transference number remain a challenge, in particular for new battery chemistries beyond Lithium such as Na, K and Mg. Herein, we demonstrate the versatility of a polymeric ionic liquid (PolyIL) as a solid-state solvent to achieve this goal for both Na and K. Using molecular simulations, we predict and elucidate fast metal ion transport in PolyILs through a structural diffusion mechanism in a polymer-in-salt environment, facilitating a high transference number. Experimental validation of these computational designed Na and K polymer electrolytes gives high ionic conductivities of 1.010-3 S cm-1 at 80 oC and an exceptional Na+ transference number of ~0.57. Electrochemical cycling of a sodium anode also demonstrates an ultra-low overpotential of 40 mV and stable long term performance of more than 100 hours in a symmetric cell. PolyIL-based polymer-in-salt strategies for novel solid-state electrolytes thus offer a promising route to design high performance next generation sustainable battery chemistries.
Notes Preprint under review
Language eng
DOI 10.21203/rs.3.rs-532893/v1
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 030306 Synthesis of Materials
030399 Macromolecular and Materials Chemistry not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152125

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.