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Child-Centred Teaching: Helping Each Child to Reach Their Full Potential

Nicholas, Maria, Rouse, Elizabeth and Paatsch, Louise 2021, Child-Centred Teaching: Helping Each Child to Reach Their Full Potential, Education Sciences, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 280-280, doi: 10.3390/educsci11060280.

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Title Child-Centred Teaching: Helping Each Child to Reach Their Full Potential
Author(s) Nicholas, MariaORCID iD for Nicholas, Maria orcid.org/0000-0001-5979-4288
Rouse, ElizabethORCID iD for Rouse, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-2889-5382
Paatsch, LouiseORCID iD for Paatsch, Louise orcid.org/0000-0003-3978-9603
Journal name Education Sciences
Volume number 11
Issue number 6
Start page 280
End page 280
Total pages 19
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2227-7102
Keyword(s) child-centred learning
child-centred teaching
early childhood
elementary school
informal assessments
learning and development
primary school
reading education
school readiness
standardized assessments
Summary Research has shown that schoolteachers often prepare children for success in standardized reading assessments by ‘teaching to the test.’ Concurrently, research exploring children’s emergent literacies and ‘school readiness’ has shown that early childhood teachers often feel pressured to ‘prepare’ children for school and may do so by focusing on print-related literacies, to the detriment of earlier stages of the oral-to-print continuum. This raises the concern that teaching children as a group, preparing them for the next ‘stage of education,’ will disadvantage children who are workingbelow or above expected levels of development. Our study explores the teaching approaches used with a group of foundation-year children who achieved more advanced reading outcomes than children from four adjacent classrooms in their first year of schooling. We collected the reading and letter-identification outcomes of 16 children in the teacher’s foundation-year class and interviewed her about her practices. Findings showed that the teacher used her knowledge of what the childrenshould achieve in standardized assessments as a minimum expectation and moved beyond the content of such assessments when warranted, as determined by informal assessments. As a result, every child in the class met, and many exceeded, minimum reading standards by year’s end. We conclude that using an individualized, child-centred pedagogy, informed by a combination ofstandardized and informal assessments, allowed the teacher to support her students to develop a range of reading abilities and to reach their full potential.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/educsci11060280
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1301 Education Systems
1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy
1303 Specialist Studies in Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152230

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Education
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.