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An initial study on the agreement of body temperatures measured by infrared cameras and oral thermometry

Adams, Scott, Bucknall, Tracey and Kouzani, Abbas 2021, An initial study on the agreement of body temperatures measured by infrared cameras and oral thermometry, Scientific reports, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1038/s41598-021-91361-6.

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Title An initial study on the agreement of body temperatures measured by infrared cameras and oral thermometry
Author(s) Adams, ScottORCID iD for Adams, Scott orcid.org/0000-0001-6466-0444
Bucknall, TraceyORCID iD for Bucknall, Tracey orcid.org/0000-0001-9089-3583
Kouzani, AbbasORCID iD for Kouzani, Abbas orcid.org/0000-0002-6292-1214
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 11
Issue number 1
Article ID 11901
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021-12
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) Biomedical engineering
Fever
Population screening
Summary The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the rapid adoption and rollout of thermal camera-based Infrared Thermography (IRT) systems for fever detection. These systems use facial infrared emissions to detect individuals exhibiting an elevated core-body temperature, which is present in many symptomatic presentations of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Despite the rollout of these systems, there is little independent research supporting their efficacy. The primary objective of this study was to assess the precision and accuracy of IRT screening solutions in a real-world scenario. The method used was a single-centre, observational study investigating the agreement of three IRT systems compared to digital oral thermometer measurements of body temperature. Over 5 days, 107 measurements were taken from individuals wearing facial masks. During each entry, two measurements of the subject’s body temperature were made from each system to allow for the evaluation of the measurement precision, followed by an oral thermometer measurement. Each participant also answered a short demographic survey. This study found that the precision of the IRT systems was wider than 0.3 °C claimed accuracy of two of the systems. This study also found that the IRT measurements were only weakly correlated to those of the oral temperature. Additionally, it was found that demographic characteristics (age, gender, and mask-type) impacted the measurement error. This study indicates that using IRT systems in front-line scenarios poses a potential risk, where a lack of measurement accuracy could possibly allow febrile individuals to pass through undetected. Further research is required into methods which could increase accuracy and improve the techniques viability.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-021-91361-6
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152249

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.