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How to Change Young Children's Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: Mechanisms of Behavior Change in the INFANT Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

Hesketh, Kylie, Kuswara, Konsita, Abbott, Gavin, Salmon, Jo-Ann, Hnatiuk, Jill and Campbell, Karen 2021, How to Change Young Children's Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: Mechanisms of Behavior Change in the INFANT Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial, Children, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/children8060470.

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Title How to Change Young Children's Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: Mechanisms of Behavior Change in the INFANT Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial
Author(s) Hesketh, KylieORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Kuswara, KonsitaORCID iD for Kuswara, Konsita orcid.org/0000-0003-0755-8253
Abbott, GavinORCID iD for Abbott, Gavin orcid.org/0000-0003-4014-0705
Salmon, Jo-AnnORCID iD for Salmon, Jo-Ann orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Hnatiuk, JillORCID iD for Hnatiuk, Jill orcid.org/0000-0002-5754-7176
Campbell, KarenORCID iD for Campbell, Karen orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Journal name Children
Volume number 8
Issue number 6
Article ID 470
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-06
ISSN 2227-9067
2227-9067
Keyword(s) active play
early childhood
FEEDING PRACTICES
intervention
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
MEDIATIONAL MODELS
mediators
movement behaviors
NUTRITION
Pediatrics
PREVENT CHILDHOOD OBESITY
RISK BEHAVIORS
Science & Technology
SCREEN TIME
television viewing
Summary Background: Understanding the mechanisms (mediators) of behavior change is crucial to designing more effective interventions. However, this is rarely reported. This paper investigates the mechanisms that explain the lack of intervention effect on physical activity and the significant effect on television viewing time from an early childhood trial. Methods: Secondary analyses were undertaken of data from a cluster randomized controlled trial. The Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (INFANT) was a 15-month group program promoting obesity-protective behaviors from the age of 4 months. Outcomes relevant to the current study were child physical activity (accelerometer), television viewing time (maternal report) and 12 potential mediator scales (maternal report). Linear regression models used the product of coefficients method with a joint significance test. Results: Complete data were from 398 mother-child dyads. Despite weak evidence of an intervention effect on the mother’s physical activity knowledge and optimism, there was no effect on children’s physical activity, and no clear mechanisms were identified. An intervention effect was observed for the mothers’ television knowledge (unstandardized regression coefficient for a path (a) = 0.34, 95% confidence interval (CI95) = 0.22, 0.45), with weak evidence for maternal efficacy (a = 0.11, CI95 = −0.02, 0.24) and the use of television (a = −0.10, CI95 = −0.22, 0.01). The intervention impact on television knowledge explained 75% of the difference between the intervention and control groups in children’s television viewing. Conclusions: In the very early childhood period, as mothers are commencing their parenting journey, improving their behavioral knowledge appears to be the biggest contributor to reducing child television viewing, constituting a relatively simple strategy that could be implemented across clinical and public health settings. In contrast, it remains unclear what mechanisms may increase physical activity levels in this age group.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/children8060470
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID NHMRC 425801
NHMRC 1176885
ARC FT 130100637
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152253

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.