Title: Evaluating the implementation and customer acceptability of a sugar-sweetened beverage reduction initiative in 30 Australian aquatic and recreation centres

Boelsen-Robinson, Tara, Jerebine, Alethea, Kurzeme, A, Gilham, B, Huse, Oliver, Blake, Miranda, Backholer, Kathryn, Chung, A and Peeters, Anna 2021, Title: Evaluating the implementation and customer acceptability of a sugar-sweetened beverage reduction initiative in 30 Australian aquatic and recreation centres, Public Health Nutrition, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1017/S1368980021002421.

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Title Title: Evaluating the implementation and customer acceptability of a sugar-sweetened beverage reduction initiative in 30 Australian aquatic and recreation centres
Author(s) Boelsen-Robinson, TaraORCID iD for Boelsen-Robinson, Tara orcid.org/0000-0003-1671-3091
Jerebine, Alethea
Kurzeme, A
Gilham, BORCID iD for Gilham, B orcid.org/0000-0002-9366-8012
Huse, OliverORCID iD for Huse, Oliver orcid.org/0000-0002-0649-2320
Blake, MirandaORCID iD for Blake, Miranda orcid.org/0000-0002-3323-575X
Backholer, Kathryn
Chung, AORCID iD for Chung, A orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Peeters, Anna
Journal name Public Health Nutrition
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Drink
Healthy food
Policy
Process evaluation
Sports and recreation
Sugar-sweetened beverage
Summary Abstract Objective: To assess the feasibility of implementation and customer perspectives of a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) reduction initiative across YMCA Victoria aquatic and recreation centres. Design: Two data sources were used to assess implementation and customer acceptability. Photo audits were used to assess the type of drinks available for purchase 6 months prior to initiative implementation and 6 months after, in thirty centres. Change in the range of SSB targeted for removal, non-targeted SSB, as well as drinks classified as ‘red’ (limit), ‘amber’ (choose carefully) and ‘green’ (best choice), was reported. Customer surveys were conducted in three centres to assess acceptability and awareness of the initiative. Inductive and deductive thematic analysis was used to analyse customers’ perspectives of the initiative. Setting: 30 aquatic and recreation centres in Victoria, Australia. Participants: 806 customers. Results: At post-implementation, 87 % of centres had removed targeted SSB. ‘Red’ drinks reduced by an average of 4·4 drink varieties compared to pre-implementation (11·9 varieties) and ‘green’ drinks increased by 1·4 varieties (3·2 varieties pre-implementation). Customers were largely unaware of the SSB-reduction initiative (90 %) but supported YMCA Victoria in continuing the initiative (89 %), with many believing it would support children in making healthier choices. Conclusions: Implementation of an initiative that limited SSB availability across a large number of aquatic and recreation centres was feasible and considered acceptable by customers. Customers frequently mentioned the importance of protecting children from consuming SSB.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980021002421
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152297

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
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