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Personal barriers to addressing intimate partner abuse: a qualitative meta-synthesis of healthcare practitioners’ experiences

Tarzia, L, Cameron, J, Watson, Joanne, Fiolet, Renee, Baloch, S, Robertson, R, Kyei-Onanjiri, M, McKibbin, G and Hegarty, K 2021, Personal barriers to addressing intimate partner abuse: a qualitative meta-synthesis of healthcare practitioners’ experiences, BMC Health Services Research, vol. 21, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1186/s12913-021-06582-2.

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Title Personal barriers to addressing intimate partner abuse: a qualitative meta-synthesis of healthcare practitioners’ experiences
Author(s) Tarzia, L
Cameron, J
Watson, JoanneORCID iD for Watson, Joanne orcid.org/0000-0001-5015-3492
Fiolet, ReneeORCID iD for Fiolet, Renee orcid.org/0000-0001-5503-9875
Baloch, S
Robertson, R
Kyei-Onanjiri, M
McKibbin, G
Hegarty, K
Journal name BMC Health Services Research
Volume number 21
Article ID 567
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1472-6963
1472-6963
Keyword(s) Barriers
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Health Care Sciences & Services
Health practitioners
IDENTIFICATION
INTERVENTIONS
Intimate partner violence
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
MANAGEMENT
NORMALIZATION
OPINIONS
PHYSICIANS
PROVIDERS PERCEPTIONS
Qualitative meta-synthesis
Science & Technology
VICTIMS
WOMEN
Summary Abstract Background Healthcare practitioners (HCPs) play a crucial role in recognising, responding to, and supporting female patients experiencing intimate partner abuse (IPA). However, research consistently identifies barriers they perceive prevent them from doing this work effectively. These barriers can be system-based (e.g. lack of time or training) or personal/individual. This review of qualitative evidence aims to synthesise the personal barriers that impact HCPs’ responses to IPA. Methods Five databases were searched in March 2020. Studies needed to utilise qualitative methods for both data collection and analysis and be published between 2010 and 2020 in order to qualify for inclusion; however, we considered any type of healthcare setting in any country. Article screening, data extraction and methodological appraisal using a modified version of the Critical Appraisal Skills Program checklist for qualitative studies were undertaken by at least two independent reviewers. Data analysis drew on Thomas and Harden’s thematic synthesis approach. Results Twenty-nine studies conducted in 20 countries informed the final review. A variety of HCPs and settings were represented. Three themes were developed that describe the personal barriers experienced by HCPs: I can’t interfere (which describes the belief that IPA is a “private matter” and HCPs’ fears of causing harm by intervening); I don’t have control (highlighting HCPs’ frustration when women do not follow their advice); and I won’t take responsibility (which illuminates beliefs that addressing IPA should be someone else’s job). Conclusion This review highlights the need for training to address personal issues in addition to structural or organisational barriers. Education and training for HCPs needs to: encourage reflection on their own values to reinforce their commitment to addressing IPA; teach HCPs to relinquish the need to control outcomes so that they can adopt an advocacy approach; and support HCPs’ trust in the critical role they can play in responding. Future research should explore effective ways to do this within the context of complex healthcare organisations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12913-021-06582-2
Field of Research 0807 Library and Information Studies
1110 Nursing
1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152369

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.