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Personalised nutrition advice reduces intake of discretionary foods and beverages: findings from the Food4Me randomised controlled trial

Livingstone, Katherine M., Celis-Morales, C, Navas-Carretero, S, San-Cristobal, R, Forster, H, Woolhead, C, O’Donovan, C B, Moschonis, G, Manios, Y, Traczyk, I, Gundersen, T E, Drevon, C A, Marsaux, C F M, Fallaize, R, Macready, A L, Daniel, H, Saris, W H M, Lovegrove, J A, Gibney, M, Gibney, E R, Walsh, M, Brennan, L, Martinez, J A and Mathers, J C 2021, Personalised nutrition advice reduces intake of discretionary foods and beverages: findings from the Food4Me randomised controlled trial, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 18, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12966-021-01136-5.

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Title Personalised nutrition advice reduces intake of discretionary foods and beverages: findings from the Food4Me randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Livingstone, Katherine M.ORCID iD for Livingstone, Katherine M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9682-7541
Celis-Morales, C
Navas-Carretero, S
San-Cristobal, R
Forster, H
Woolhead, C
O’Donovan, C B
Moschonis, G
Manios, Y
Traczyk, I
Gundersen, T E
Drevon, C A
Marsaux, C F M
Fallaize, R
Macready, A L
Daniel, H
Saris, W H M
Lovegrove, J A
Gibney, M
Gibney, E R
Walsh, M
Brennan, L
Martinez, J A
Mathers, J C
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 18
Article ID 70
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021-06
ISSN 1479-5868
1479-5868
Keyword(s) Adults
CONSUMPTION
Discretionary
Discretionary foods and beverages
DISEASE
ENERGY
European
Food4Me
Internet-based
Intervention
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
MEDITERRANEAN DIET
NATIONAL-HEALTH
Nutrition & Dietetics
PARTICIPANTS
Personalised nutrition
Physiology
REPORTED DIETARY MEASURES
Science & Technology
SOCIAL DESIRABILITY TRAIT
SUGAR-SWEETENED BEVERAGES
Adults, Food4Me
Food4Me Study
Summary Background
The effect of personalised nutrition advice on discretionary foods intake is unknown. To date, two national classifications for discretionary foods have been derived. This study examined changes in intake of discretionary foods and beverages following a personalised nutrition intervention using these two classifications.
Methods
Participants were recruited into a 6-month RCT across seven European countries (Food4Me) and were randomised to receive generalised dietary advice (control) or one of three levels of personalised nutrition advice (based on diet [L1], phenotype [L2] and genotype [L3]). Dietary intake was derived from an FFQ. An analysis of covariance was used to determine intervention effects at month 6 between personalised nutrition (overall and by levels) and control on i) percentage energy from discretionary items and ii) percentage contribution of total fat, SFA, total sugars and salt to discretionary intake, defined by Food Standards Scotland (FSS) and Australian Dietary Guidelines (ADG) classifications.
Results
Of the 1607 adults at baseline, n = 1270 (57% female) completed the intervention. Percentage sugars from FSS discretionary items was lower in personalised nutrition vs control (19.0 ± 0.37 vs 21.1 ± 0.65; P = 0.005). Percentage energy (31.2 ± 0.59 vs 32.7 ± 0.59; P = 0.031), percentage total fat (31.5 ± 0.37 vs 33.3 ± 0.65; P = 0.021), SFA (36.0 ± 0.43 vs 37.8 ± 0.75; P = 0.034) and sugars (31.7 ± 0.44 vs 34.7 ± 0.78; P < 0.001) from ADG discretionary items were lower in personalised nutrition vs control. There were greater reductions in ADG percentage energy and percentage total fat, SFA and salt for those randomised to L3 vs L2.
Conclusions
Compared with generalised dietary advice, personalised nutrition advice achieved greater reductions in discretionary foods intake when the classification included all foods high in fat, added sugars and salt. Future personalised nutrition approaches may be used to target intake of discretionary foods
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-021-01136-5
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 11 Medical and Health Sciences
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152573

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.