The burden of excessive saturated fatty acid intake attributed to ultra-processed food consumption: a study conducted with nationally representative cross-sectional studies from eight countries

Steele, EM, Batis, C, Cediel, G, Louzada, MLDC, Khandpur, N, Machado, P, Moubarac, JC, Rauber, F, Jedlicki, MR, Levy, RB and Monteiro, CA 2021, The burden of excessive saturated fatty acid intake attributed to ultra-processed food consumption: a study conducted with nationally representative cross-sectional studies from eight countries, Journal of nutritional science, vol. 10, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1017/jns.2021.30.

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Title The burden of excessive saturated fatty acid intake attributed to ultra-processed food consumption: a study conducted with nationally representative cross-sectional studies from eight countries
Author(s) Steele, EM
Batis, C
Cediel, G
Louzada, MLDC
Khandpur, N
Machado, P
Moubarac, JC
Rauber, F
Jedlicki, MR
Levy, RB
Monteiro, CA
Journal name Journal of nutritional science
Volume number 10
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2048-6790
2048-6790
Keyword(s) Diet
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
PALM OIL
Population attributable fraction
Saturated fatty acids
Science & Technology
Ultra-processed foods
CI, confidence interval
CVD, cardiovascular disease
ES, estimated size
NCD, non-communicable disease
PAF, population attributable fraction
PR, prevalence ratio
UPF, ultra-processed food
Summary Abstract Cross-sectional nutritional survey data collected in eight countries were used to estimate saturated fatty acid intakes. Our objective was to estimate the proportion of excessive saturated fatty acid intakes (>10 % of total energy intake) that could be avoided if ultra-processed food consumption was reduced to levels observed in the first quintile of each country. Secondary analysis was performed of 24 h dietary recall or food diary/record data collected by the most recently available nationally representative cross-sectional surveys carried out in Brazil (2008–9), Chile (2010), Colombia (2005), Mexico (2012), Australia (2011–12), the UK (2008–16), Canada (2015) and the US (2015–16). Population attributable fractions estimated the impact of reducing ultra-processed food consumption on excessive saturated fatty acid intakes (above 10 % of total energy intake) in each country. Significant relative reductions in the percentage of excessive saturated fatty acid intakes would be observed in all countries if ultra-processed food consumption was reduced to levels observed in the first quintile's consumption. The reductions in excessive intakes ranged from 10⋅0 % (95 % CI 6⋅2–13⋅6 %) in Canada to 35⋅0 % (95 % CI 28⋅7–48⋅0 %) in Mexico. In all eight studied countries, all presenting more than 30 % of intakes with excessive saturated fatty acids, lowering the dietary contribution of ultra-processed foods to attainable, context-specific levels was shown to be a potentially effective way to reduce the percentage of intakes with excessive saturated fatty acids, which may play an important role in the prevention of non-communicable diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/jns.2021.30
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152576

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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