Openly accessible

Parent and Peer Attachments in Adolescence and Paternal Postpartum Mental Health: Findings From the ATP Generation 3 Study

Macdonald, Jacqueline, Greenwood, Christopher, Letcher, Primrose, Spry, Elizabeth, Mansour, K, McIntosh, JE, Thomson, KC, Deane, C, Biden, Ebony, Edwards, B, Hutchinson, Delyse, Cleary, J, Toumbourou, John, Sanson, AV and Olsson, Craig 2021, Parent and Peer Attachments in Adolescence and Paternal Postpartum Mental Health: Findings From the ATP Generation 3 Study, Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 12, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.672174.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Parent and Peer Attachments in Adolescence and Paternal Postpartum Mental Health: Findings From the ATP Generation 3 Study
Author(s) Macdonald, JacquelineORCID iD for Macdonald, Jacqueline orcid.org/0000-0001-9451-2709
Greenwood, ChristopherORCID iD for Greenwood, Christopher orcid.org/0000-0002-9211-6312
Letcher, Primrose
Spry, Elizabeth
Mansour, K
McIntosh, JE
Thomson, KC
Deane, CORCID iD for Deane, C orcid.org/0000-0003-3221-7143
Biden, Ebony
Edwards, BORCID iD for Edwards, B orcid.org/0000-0002-8431-3762
Hutchinson, Delyse
Cleary, JORCID iD for Cleary, J orcid.org/0000-0002-5927-2014
Toumbourou, John
Sanson, AV
Olsson, Craig
Journal name Frontiers in Psychology
Volume number 12
Article ID 672174
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Pully, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-05-28
ISSN 1664-1078
1664-1078
Keyword(s) cohort studies
father
longitudinal
mental health
parents
peers
postpartum
Psychology
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
relationship
Social Sciences
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
SELF-ESTEEM
PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS
EMOTION SOCIALIZATION
PERINATAL DEPRESSION
EMERGING ADULTHOOD
EXPECTANT FATHERS
1ST-TIME FATHERS
ANXIETY
CHILDHOOD
Summary Background: When adolescent boys experience close, secure relationships with their parents and peers, the implications are potentially far reaching, including lower levels of mental health problems in adolescence and young adulthood. Here we use rare prospective intergenerational data to extend our understanding of the impact of adolescent attachments on subsequent postpartum mental health problems in early fatherhood.Methods: At age 17–18 years, we used an abbreviated Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment to assess trust, communication, and alienation reported by 270 male participants in their relationships with mothers, fathers, and peers. More than a decade later, we assessed the adult males, now fathers, at 12 months postpartum (N = 409 infant offspring) for symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. Logistic regression was used to examine the extent to which attachment dimensions predicted paternal postpartum mental health, adjusting for potential confounding, and with assessment for interactions between parent and peer attachments.Results: Trust in mothers and peers, and good communication with fathers during adolescence, were associated with 5 to 7 percentage point reductions in postpartum mental health symptoms in early fatherhood. Weak evidence of parent-peer interactions suggested secure attachments with either parent or peer may compensate for an insecure attachment with the other.Conclusions: Our results suggest that fostering trust and communication in relationships that adolescent boys have with parents and peers may have substantial effects on rates of paternal postpartum mental health problems. The protective benefits may be preventative in intergenerational cycles of risk for mental health problems.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.672174
Field of Research 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152643

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 20 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 18 Jun 2021, 20:06:58 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.