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Feasibility of a culturally adapted early childhood obesity prevention program among migrant mothers in Australia: a mixed methods evaluation

Marshall, Sarah, Taki, S, Love, Penelope, Laird, Y, Kearney, M, Tam, N, Baur, LA, Rissel, C and Wen, LM 2021, Feasibility of a culturally adapted early childhood obesity prevention program among migrant mothers in Australia: a mixed methods evaluation, BMC Public Health, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.1186/s12889-021-11226-5.

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Title Feasibility of a culturally adapted early childhood obesity prevention program among migrant mothers in Australia: a mixed methods evaluation
Author(s) Marshall, Sarah
Taki, SORCID iD for Taki, S orcid.org/0000-0002-1244-3947
Love, Penelope
Laird, Y
Kearney, M
Tam, N
Baur, LA
Rissel, C
Wen, LM
Journal name BMC Public Health
Volume number 21
Issue number 1
Article ID 1159
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher BMC
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1471-2458
1471-2458
Keyword(s) 1ST 1,000 DAYS
Culture
EARLY INTERVENTION
ENGLISH-SPEAKING
Ethnicity
EXPERIENCES
FEEDING PRACTICES
Health promotion
HEALTH-CARE
Implementation
Infant
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition
POPULATION
Prevention
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
Science & Technology
SERVICES
Summary Abstract Introduction Healthy Beginnings is an established nurse-led early childhood obesity prevention program that promotes healthy infant feeding practices and active play in the early years of life. To improve engagement with culturally and linguistically diverse populations, the Healthy Beginnings program delivered by telephone was culturally adapted and implemented with Arabic- and Chinese-speaking mothers in Sydney, Australia. The cultural adaptation process has been published separately. In this article, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of the culturally adapted program. Methods In 2018–2019, the culturally adapted Healthy Beginnings program was implemented with Arabic- and Chinese-speaking women recruited from antenatal clinics in Sydney. At four staged timepoints (from third trimester until 6 months of age), mothers were sent culturally adapted health promotion booklets and text messages and offered four support calls from bi-cultural child and family health nurses in Arabic and Chinese. A mixed methods evaluation included a) baseline and 6-month telephone surveys, followed by b) semi-structured follow-up interviews with a subset of participating mothers and program delivery staff. Main outcomes of this feasibility study were reach (recruitment and retention), intervention dose delivered (number of nurse support calls completed) and acceptability (appropriateness based on cognitive and emotional responses). Results At recruitment, 176 mothers were eligible and consented to participate. Of 163 mothers who completed the baseline survey, 95% completed the program (n = 8 withdrew) and 83% completed the 6-month survey (n = 70 Arabic- and n = 65 Chinese-speaking mothers). Most mothers (n = 127, 78%) completed at least one nurse support call. The qualitative analysis of follow-up interviews with 42 mothers (22 Arabic- and 20 Chinese-speaking mothers) and 10 program delivery staff highlighted the perceived value of the program and the positive role of bi-cultural nurses and in-language resources. Mothers who completed more nurse support calls generally expressed greater acceptability. Conclusions The culturally adapted Healthy Beginnings program was feasible to deliver and acceptable to Arabic- and Chinese-speaking mothers. Our results highlight the importance of in-language resources and individualised bi-cultural nurse support by telephone for supporting culturally and linguistically diverse migrant families with infant feeding and active play. These findings support the potential for program refinements and progression to an effectiveness trial.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-021-11226-5
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152843

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.