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Pushing or Pulling Your “Poison”: Clinical Correlates of Alcohol Approach and Avoidance Bias Among Inpatients Undergoing Alcohol Withdrawal Treatment

Piercy, H, Manning, V and Staiger, Petra 2021, Pushing or Pulling Your “Poison”: Clinical Correlates of Alcohol Approach and Avoidance Bias Among Inpatients Undergoing Alcohol Withdrawal Treatment, Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 12, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.663087.

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Title Pushing or Pulling Your “Poison”: Clinical Correlates of Alcohol Approach and Avoidance Bias Among Inpatients Undergoing Alcohol Withdrawal Treatment
Author(s) Piercy, H
Manning, V
Staiger, PetraORCID iD for Staiger, Petra orcid.org/0000-0002-6968-5015
Journal name Frontiers in Psychology
Volume number 12
Article ID 663087
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Pully, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-05-25
ISSN 1664-1078
1664-1078
Keyword(s) alcohol use disorder
approach bias
approach bias modification
avoidance bias
cognitive bias modification
measurement
Psychology
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Social Sciences
ACTION-TENDENCIES
APPROACH/AVOIDANCE TENDENCIES
ATTENTIONAL BIAS
DEPENDENCE
CUES
ADDICTION
DRINKING
VALIDITY
RELAPSE
Summary Introduction: Alcohol approach bias, the tendency to automatically move toward alcohol cues, has been observed in people who drink heavily. However, surprisingly, some alcohol-dependent patients demonstrate an alcohol avoidance bias. This inconsistency could be explained by the clinical or demographic profile of the population studied, yet this has not been examined in approach bias modification (ABM) trials to date. We aimed to determine the proportion of patients with an approach or avoidance bias, assess whether they differ on demographic and drinking measures, and to examine the clinical correlates of approach bias.Method: These research questions were addressed using baseline data from 268 alcohol-dependent patients undergoing inpatient withdrawal treatment who then went on to participate in a trial of ABM.Results: At trial entry (day 3 or 4 of inpatient withdrawal), 155 (57.8%) had an alcohol approach bias and 113 (42.2%) had an avoidance bias. These two groups did not differ on any demographic or relevant drinking measures. Approach bias was significantly and moderately associated with total standard drinks consumed in the past 30 days (r = 0.277, p = 0.001) but no other indices of alcohol consumption or problem severity.Conclusion: Whilst the majority of alcohol-dependent patients showed an alcohol approach bias, those with an avoidance bias did not differ in demographic or clinical characteristics, and the strength of approach bias related only to recent consumption. Further research is needed to develop more accurate and personally tailored measures of approach bias, as these findings likely reflect the poor reliability of standard approach bias measures.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.663087
Field of Research 1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30152889

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.