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The socioeconomic characteristics of childhood injuries in regional Victoria, Australia: what the missing data tells us

Peck, Blake, Terry, Daniel and Kloot, Kate 2021, The socioeconomic characteristics of childhood injuries in regional Victoria, Australia: what the missing data tells us, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 18, no. 13, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/ijerph18137005.

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Title The socioeconomic characteristics of childhood injuries in regional Victoria, Australia: what the missing data tells us
Author(s) Peck, Blake
Terry, Daniel
Kloot, KateORCID iD for Kloot, Kate orcid.org/0000-0003-2889-9639
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 18
Issue number 13
Article ID 7005
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Environmental Sciences
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
childhood injury
emergency presentation
socioeconomic
administration database
rural
RURAL-HEALTH
CHILDREN
SEEKING
DELAY
MEN
Summary Background: Injury is the leading cause of death among those between 1–16 years of age in Australia. Studies have found that injury rates increase with socioeconomic disadvantage. Rural Urgent Care Centres (UCC) represent a key point of entry into the Victorian healthcare system for people living in smaller rural communities, often categorised as lower socio-economic groups. Emergency presentation data from UCCs is not routinely collated in government datasets. This study seeks to compare socioeconomic characteristics of children aged 0–14 attending a UCC to those who attend a 24-h Emergency Departments with an injury-related emergency presentation. This will inform gaps in our current understanding of the links between socioeconomic status and childhood injury in regional Victoria. Methods: A network of rural hospitals in South West Victoria, Australia provide ongoing detailed de-identified emergency presentation data as part of the Rural Acute Hospital Data Register (RAHDaR). Data from nine of these facilities was extracted and analysed for children (aged 0–14 years) with any principal injury-related diagnosis presenting between 1 February 2017 and 31 January 2020. Results: There were 10,137 injury-related emergency presentations of children aged between 0–14 years to a participating hospital. The relationship between socioeconomic status and injury was confirmed, with overall higher rates of child injury presentations from those residing in areas of Disadvantage. A large proportion (74.3%) of the children attending rural UCCs were also Disadvantaged. Contrary to previous research, the rate of injury amongst children from urban areas was significantly higher than their more rural counterparts. Conclusions: Findings support the notion that injury in Victoria differs according to socioeconomic status and suggest that targeted interventions for the reduction of injury should consider socioeconomic as well as geographical differences in the design of their programs
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18137005
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30153315

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.