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Male barroom aggression among members of the Australian construction industry: associations with heavy episodic drinking, trait variables and masculinity factors

Litherland, Steven, Miller, Peter, Droste, Nic and Graham, Kathryn 2021, Male barroom aggression among members of the Australian construction industry: associations with heavy episodic drinking, trait variables and masculinity factors, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 18, no. 13, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.3390/ijerph18136769.

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Title Male barroom aggression among members of the Australian construction industry: associations with heavy episodic drinking, trait variables and masculinity factors
Author(s) Litherland, Steven
Miller, PeterORCID iD for Miller, Peter orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-5437
Droste, Nic
Graham, Kathryn
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 18
Issue number 13
Article ID 6769
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-07-01
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) conformity
construction workers
Environmental Sciences
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
heavy episodic drinking
impulsivity
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
male barroom aggression
male honour
narcissism
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Science & Technology
trait aggression
Summary Introduction and Aims: Past research indicates heavy episodic drinking (HED), trait aggression, male honour and conformity to masculine norms are risk factors for male barroom aggression (MBA) perpetration. However, little is known about the impact of these variables on experiences of MBA victimization. Further, data derived previously, particularly in relation to perpetration have come from relatively low-risk samples comprising university students, limiting the generalizability of findings to other, at-risk male groups. Thus, the present study assessed the impact of the aforementioned variables as well as personality constructs of impulsivity and narcissism on both the perpetration of and victimization from MBA among a high-risk sample sourced from male members of the Australian construction industry. Method: A purposive sample of Australian male construction workers aged 18 to 69 years (n = 476, Mage = 25.90, SDage = 9.44) completed individual interviews at their current place of employment or while training at various trade schools in Geelong and Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Items related to past month HED, past year experiences of verbal and physical MBA (perpetration and victimization), trait aggression’s four factors (physical, verbal, anger, hostility), impulsivity, narcissism, male honour and conformity to masculine norms. Results: Participants reported high levels of verbal (24.2%) and physical (21%) MBA perpetration and verbal (33.6%) and physical (31.1%) MBA victimization. Hierarchical binary logistic regression analyses identified HED as the strongest predictor of aggression involvement, while trait physical aggression, trait anger, narcissism and conformity to norms endorsing violence and a need to win were significantly and positively associated with MBA perpetration. Conclusions: The present study reinforces the key relationships between heavy drinking and aspects of personality and MBA, while also highlighting narcissism as a risk factor for barroom aggression perpetration. Indeed, personality profiles and HED appear to exert stronger influences on MBA perpetration than socially constructed masculinity factors, most of which were unrelated to aggression involvement in bars, clubs or pubs.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18136769
Indigenous content off
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30153392

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.