Targeting dietary restraint to reduce binge eating: A randomised controlled trial of a blended internet- And smartphone app-based intervention

Linardon, J, Mclure, Mariel, Shatte, A, Skvarc, David, Rosato, J, Rathgen, A and Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew 2021, Targeting dietary restraint to reduce binge eating: A randomised controlled trial of a blended internet- And smartphone app-based intervention, Psychological Medicine, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1017/S0033291721002786.

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Title Targeting dietary restraint to reduce binge eating: A randomised controlled trial of a blended internet- And smartphone app-based intervention
Author(s) Linardon, J
Mclure, MarielORCID iD for Mclure, Mariel orcid.org/0000-0002-7186-7264
Shatte, A
Skvarc, DavidORCID iD for Skvarc, David orcid.org/0000-0002-3334-4980
Rosato, J
Rathgen, A
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Journal name Psychological Medicine
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 0033-2917
1469-8978
Keyword(s) Binge eating
eating disorders
e-mental health
prevention
randomised controlled trial
treatment
Summary Abstract Background Existing internet-based prevention and treatment programmes for binge eating are composed of multiple distinct modules that are designed to target a broad range of risk or maintaining factors. Such multi-modular programmes (1) may be unnecessarily long for those who do not require a full course of intervention and (2) make it difficult to distinguish those techniques that are effective from those that are redundant. Since dietary restraint is a well-replicated risk and maintaining factor for binge eating, we developed an internet- and app-based intervention composed solely of cognitive-behavioural techniques designed to modify dietary restraint as a mechanism to target binge eating. We tested the efficacy of this combined selective and indicated prevention programme in 403 participants, most of whom were highly symptomatic (90% reported binge eating once per week). Method Participants were randomly assigned to the internet intervention (n = 201) or an informational control group (n = 202). The primary outcome was objective binge-eating frequency. Secondary outcomes were indices of dietary restraint, shape, weight, and eating concerns, subjective binge eating, disinhibition, and psychological distress. Analyses were intention-to-treat. Results Intervention participants reported greater reductions in objective binge-eating episodes compared to the control group at post-test (small effect size). Significant effects were also observed on each of the secondary outcomes (small to large effect sizes). Improvements were sustained at 8 week follow-up. Conclusions Highly focused digital interventions that target one central risk/maintaining factor may be sufficient to induce meaningful change in core eating disorder symptoms.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0033291721002786
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30153573

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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