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Tilapia farming in Bangladesh: adaptation to climate change

Rahman, M L, Shahjahan, M and Ahmed, Nesar 2021, Tilapia farming in Bangladesh: adaptation to climate change, Sustainability, vol. 13, no. 14, pp. 1-20, doi: 10.3390/su13147657.

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Title Tilapia farming in Bangladesh: adaptation to climate change
Author(s) Rahman, M L
Shahjahan, M
Ahmed, NesarORCID iD for Ahmed, Nesar orcid.org/0000-0003-4133-697X
Journal name Sustainability
Volume number 13
Issue number 14
Article ID 7657
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2071-1050
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Green & Sustainable Science & Technology
Environmental Sciences
Environmental Studies
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
tilapia
aquaculture
climate change
environment
adaptation
OREOCHROMIS-NILOTICUS L.
PRAWN MACROBRACHIUM-ROSENBERGII
NONSPECIFIC IMMUNE-RESPONSE
REARING MOZAMBIQUE TILAPIA
LOW-TEMPERATURE STRESS
FATTY-ACID-COMPOSITION
CYPRINUS-CARPIO L.
RICE-FISH CULTURE
NILE TILAPIA
GROWTH-PERFORMANCE
Summary In Bangladesh, aquaculture is critically important in terms of providing food and nutrition, sustainable livelihoods, income, and export earnings. Nevertheless, aquaculture in Bangladesh has faced recent concerns due to climate change. Aquaculture is vulnerable to a combination of climatic factors, such as global warming, rainfall variation, flood, drought, temperature fluctuation, and salinity change. Considering the vulnerability of fish production to the impacts of climate change, tilapia farming is one of the possible strategies for adaptation to climate change. The positive culture attributes of tilapia are their tolerance to low water levels and poor water quality with rainfall variation, temperature fluctuation, and salinity change. In fact, tilapia farming is possible in a wide range of water environments, including freshwater, brackish water, and saltwater conditions. We suggest that appropriate tilapia culture strategies with institutional support and collaboration with key stakeholders are needed for adaptation to environmental change.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/su13147657
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 12 Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30153581

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.