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Changes in public preferences for technologically enhanced surveillance following the COVID-19 pandemic: a discrete choice experiment

Degeling, C, Chen, G, Gilbert, GL, Brookes, V, Thai, Thi Hong Thao, Wilson, A and Johnson, J 2020, Changes in public preferences for technologically enhanced surveillance following the COVID-19 pandemic: a discrete choice experiment, BMJ Open, vol. 10, no. 11, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-041592.

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Title Changes in public preferences for technologically enhanced surveillance following the COVID-19 pandemic: a discrete choice experiment
Author(s) Degeling, C
Chen, G
Gilbert, GL
Brookes, V
Thai, Thi Hong Thao
Wilson, A
Johnson, J
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 10
Issue number 11
Article ID e041592
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BMJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2020
ISSN 2044-6055
2044-6055
Summary ObjectivesAs governments attempt to navigate a path out of COVID-19 restrictions, robust evidence is essential to inform requirements for public acceptance of technologically enhanced communicable disease surveillance systems. We examined the value of core surveillance system attributes to the Australian public, before and during the early stages of the current pandemic.DesignA discrete choice experiment was conducted in Australia with a representative group of respondents, before and after the WHO declared COVID-19 a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. We identified and investigated the relative importance of seven attributes associated with technologically enhanced disease surveillance: respect for personal autonomy; privacy/confidentiality; data certainty/confidence; data security; infectious disease mortality prevention; infectious disease morbidity prevention; and attribution of (causal) responsibility. Specifically, we explored how the onset of the COVID-19 outbreak influenced participant responses.Setting and participants2008 Australians (general public) completed the experiment: 793 before COVID-19 outbreak onset (mean age 45.9 years, 50.2% male) and 1215 after onset (mean age 47.2 years, 49% male).ResultsAll seven attributes significantly influenced respondents’ preferences for communicable disease surveillance systems. After onset, participants demonstrated greater preference for a surveillance system that could prevent a higher number of illnesses and deaths, and were less concerned about their personal autonomy. However, they also increased their preference for a system with high data security.ConclusionsPublic acceptance of technology-based communicable disease surveillance is situation dependent. During an epidemic, there is likely to be greater tolerance of technologically enhanced disease surveillance systems that result in restrictions on personal activity if such systems can prevent high morbidity and mortality. However, this acceptance of lower personal autonomy comes with an increased requirement to ensure data security. These findings merit further research as the pandemic unfolds and strategies are put in place that enable individuals and societies to live with SARS-CoV-2 endemicity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-041592
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30153694

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.