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Cocaine-Induced Changes in Tonic Dopamine Concentrations Measured Using Multiple-Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry in vivo

Yuen, J, Goyal, A, Rusheen, AE, Kouzani, Abbas, Berk, Michael, Kim, Jee Hyun, Tye, SJ, Blaha, CD, Bennet, KE, Jang, DP, Lee, KH, Shin, H and Oh, Y 2021, Cocaine-Induced Changes in Tonic Dopamine Concentrations Measured Using Multiple-Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry in vivo, Frontiers in Pharmacology, vol. 12, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.3389/fphar.2021.705254.

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Title Cocaine-Induced Changes in Tonic Dopamine Concentrations Measured Using Multiple-Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry in vivo
Author(s) Yuen, J
Goyal, A
Rusheen, AE
Kouzani, AbbasORCID iD for Kouzani, Abbas orcid.org/0000-0002-6292-1214
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Kim, Jee HyunORCID iD for Kim, Jee Hyun orcid.org/0000-0002-1299-4300
Tye, SJ
Blaha, CD
Bennet, KE
Jang, DP
Lee, KH
Shin, H
Oh, Y
Journal name Frontiers in Pharmacology
Volume number 12
Article ID 705254
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-07-06
ISSN 1663-9812
1663-9812
Keyword(s) addiction
cocaine
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
mental disorders
neuroscience
nucleus accumbens
Pharmacology & Pharmacy
psychiatry
Science & Technology
tonic dopamine
voltammetry
INCREASE EXTRACELLULAR DOPAMINE
NUCLEUS-ACCUMBENS
LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY
SEEKING BEHAVIOR
DORSAL STRIATUM
MICRODIALYSIS
RELEASE
SHELL
CORE
NEUROTRANSMITTERS
Summary For over 40 years, in vivo microdialysis techniques have been at the forefront in measuring the effects of illicit substances on brain tonic extracellular levels of dopamine that underlie many aspects of drug addiction. However, the size of microdialysis probes and sampling rate may limit this technique’s ability to provide an accurate assessment of drug effects in microneural environments. A novel electrochemical method known as multiple-cyclic square wave voltammetry (M-CSWV), was recently developed to measure second-to-second changes in tonic dopamine levels at microelectrodes, providing spatiotemporal resolution superior to microdialysis. Here, we utilized M-CSWV and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure changes in tonic or phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcc) after acute cocaine administration. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFM) and stimulating electrodes were implanted into the NAcc and medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of urethane anesthetized (1.5 g/kg i.p.) Sprague-Dawley rats, respectively. Using FSCV, depths of each electrode were optimized by determining maximal MFB electrical stimulation-evoked phasic dopamine release. Changes in phasic responses were measured after a single dose of intravenous saline or cocaine hydrochloride (3 mg/kg; n = 4). In a separate group, changes in tonic dopamine levels were measured using M-CSWV after intravenous saline and after cocaine hydrochloride (3 mg/kg; n = 5). Both the phasic and tonic dopamine responses in the NAcc were augmented by the injection of cocaine compared to saline control. The phasic and tonic levels changed by approximately x2.4 and x1.9, respectively. These increases were largely consistent with previous studies using FSCV and microdialysis. However, the minimal disruption/disturbance of neuronal tissue by the CFM may explain why the baseline tonic dopamine values (134 ± 32 nM) measured by M-CSWV were found to be 10-fold higher when compared to conventional microdialysis. In this study, we demonstrated phasic dopamine dynamics in the NAcc with acute cocaine administration. M-CSWV was able to record rapid changes in tonic levels of dopamine, which cannot be achieved with other current voltammetric techniques. Taken together, M-CSWV has the potential to provide an unprecedented level of physiologic insight into dopamine signaling, both in vitro and in vivo, which will significantly enhance our understanding of neurochemical mechanisms underlying psychiatric conditions.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphar.2021.705254
Field of Research 1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30153711

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.