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Home Information and Communication Technology Use and Student Academic Performance: Encouraging Results for Uncertain Times

Skvarc, David, Talbot, M, Harries, T, Wilson, CJ, Joshua, N and Byrne, Linda 2021, Home Information and Communication Technology Use and Student Academic Performance: Encouraging Results for Uncertain Times, Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 12, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.638319.

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Title Home Information and Communication Technology Use and Student Academic Performance: Encouraging Results for Uncertain Times
Author(s) Skvarc, DavidORCID iD for Skvarc, David orcid.org/0000-0002-3334-4980
Talbot, M
Harries, T
Wilson, CJ
Joshua, N
Byrne, LindaORCID iD for Byrne, Linda orcid.org/0000-0001-9055-0046
Journal name Frontiers in Psychology
Volume number 12
Article ID 638319
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2021-06-23
ISSN 1664-1078
1664-1078
Keyword(s) academic performance
home education
home learning
information technology
Psychology
Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Social Sciences
technology access
YOUNG-CHILDREN
DIGITAL DIVIDE
COMPUTER USE
ICT
ACHIEVEMENT
MATHEMATICS
TEACHERS
ACCESS
MODEL
Summary This study set out to examine the associations of certain information communication technology (ICT) factors in the home environment with academic performance. We employed existing data sets collated by Pearson Clinical Assessment in 2016 which included the WIAT-III A&NZ (Wechsler Individual Achievement Test - Australian and New Zealand Standardised, Third Edition) completed by 714 students aged between 4 and 18 years old, and the home environment questionnaire (HEQ) completed by the parents of those children. Sequential multiple regression models were used to analyze the complex interactions between home ICT factors and measures of student reading, writing, mathematical, and oral ability. The findings of this study indicate that after accounting for the known powerful predictors of household income and parental education: (a) a student’s access to an ICT rich home environment, (b) their aptitude in using home ICT, and (c) their recreational use of home ICT, are largely unrelated to academic performance. We observed some small positive correlations between academic performance and child ICT affinity, but also comparably sized negative associations with use of social media and educational TV viewing. Encouragingly, we propose that these findings suggest that increasing levels of ICT use and access in the home are unlikely to be detrimental to academic progress. These results provide important information for parents and educators given the impact of the Coronavirus global pandemic and the near world-wide adoption of ICT for home-schooling.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.638319
Field of Research 1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30153773

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.