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Inappropriate medications and physical function: a systematic review

Manias, Elizabeth, Kabir, MZ and Maier, AB 2021, Inappropriate medications and physical function: a systematic review, Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety, vol. 12, pp. 1-24, doi: 10.1177/20420986211030371.

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Title Inappropriate medications and physical function: a systematic review
Author(s) Manias, ElizabethORCID iD for Manias, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-3747-0087
Kabir, MZ
Maier, AB
Journal name Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety
Volume number 12
Start page 1
End page 24
Total pages 24
Publisher SAGE Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2042-0986
2042-0994
Keyword(s) activities of daily living
aged
functional independence
independent living
medication therapy management
physical function
Summary Background and aims: Inappropriate medication prescription is highly prevalent in older adults and is associated with adverse health outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between potentially inappropriate medications (PIMS) and potential prescribing omissions with physical function in older adults situated in diverse environments. Methods: A systematic search was completed using the following databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE and COCHRANE. Results were extracted from the included studies. Results: In total, 55 studies reported on 2,767,594 participants with a mean age of 77.1 years (63.5% women). Study designs comprised 26 retrospective cohort studies, 21 prospective cohort studies and 8 cross-sectional studies. Inappropriate medications in community and hospital settings were significantly associated with higher risk of falls (21 out of 30 studies), higher risk of fractures (7 out of 9 studies), impaired activities of daily living (ADL; 8 out of 10 studies) and impaired instrumental ADL (IADL) score (4 out of 6 studies). Five out of seven studies also showed that PIMs were associated with poorer physical performance comprising the Timed Up and Go test, walking speed, grip strength, time to functional recovery, functional independence and scale of functioning. Many medication classes were implicated as PIMs in falls, fractures and impairment in physical performance including antipsychotic, sedative, anti-anxiety, anticholinergic, antidiabetic, opioid and antihypertensive medications. For patients not receiving musculoskeletal medications, such as calcium, vitamin D and bisphosphonates, older adults were found to be at risk of a hospital admission for a fall or fracture. Conclusion: Inappropriate medication prescriptions are associated with impaired physical function across longitudinal and cross-sectional studies in older adults situated in diverse settings. It is important to support older people to reduce their use of inappropriate medications and prevent prescribing omissions. Plain language summary Inappropriate medications and physical function Background and aims: The use of inappropriate medications is very common in older adults and is associated with harmful health problems. The aim was to examine associations between potentially inappropriate medications and potential prescribing omissions with physical function in older adults situated in diverse environments. Methods: Library databases were examined for possible studies to include and a systematic search was completed. Relevant information was obtained from the included studies. Results: In total, 55 studies reported on 2,767,594 participants who were an average age of 77.1 years and about 6 out of 10 were women. A variety of different study designs were used. Inappropriate medication prescriptions in community and hospital settings were significantly associated with higher risk of falls (21 out of 30 studies), higher risk of fractures (7 out of 9 studies), problems with activities of daily living (ADL), such as eating, bathing, dressing, grooming, walking and toileting (8 out of 10 studies) and problems with instrumental ADL such as managing medications, house cleaning and shopping (4 out of 6 studies). Five out of seven studies also showed that inappropriate medications were associated with poorer physical performance involving the Timed Up and Go test, walking speed, grip strength, time to functional recovery, functional independence and scale of functioning. Many types of medication classes were shown to be associated with a risk of falls, fractures and problems with physical performance. Omitted medications were also associated with falls and fractures. Conclusion: Inappropriate medication prescriptions are associated with problems relating to physical function. It is important to support older people to reduce their use of inappropriate medications and prevent prescribing omissions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/20420986211030371
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30153878

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.