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A review of chlamydial infections in wild birds

Stokes, Helena, Berg, Mathew and Bennett, Andrew 2021, A review of chlamydial infections in wild birds, Pathogens, vol. 10, no. 8, pp. 1-23, doi: 10.3390/pathogens10080948.

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Title A review of chlamydial infections in wild birds
Author(s) Stokes, HelenaORCID iD for Stokes, Helena orcid.org/0000-0002-5774-3089
Berg, MathewORCID iD for Berg, Mathew orcid.org/0000-0001-8512-2805
Bennett, Andrew
Journal name Pathogens
Volume number 10
Issue number 8
Article ID 948
Start page 1
End page 23
Total pages 23
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 2076-0817
Keyword(s) Chlamydia
Chlamydia psittaci
psittacosis
chlamydiosis
birds
Chlamydiales
bacteria
zoonoses
Summary The Chlamydia are a globally distributed genus of bacteria that can infect and cause disease in a range of hosts. Birds are the primary host for multiple chlamydial species. The most well-known of these is Chlamydia psittaci, a zoonotic bacterium that has been identified in a range of wild and domesticated birds. Wild birds are often proposed as a reservoir of Chlamydia psittaci and potentially other chlamydial species. The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge of chlamydial infections in wild avian populations. We focus on C. psittaci but also consider other Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia-related bacteria that have been identified in wild birds. We summarise the diversity, host range, and clinical signs of infection in wild birds and consider the potential implications of these infections for zoonotic transmission and avian conservation. Chlamydial bacteria have been found in more than 70 species of wild birds, with the greatest chlamydial diversity identified in Europe. The Corvidae and Accipitridae families are emerging as significant chlamydial hosts, in addition to established wild hosts such as the Columbidae. Clarifying the effects of these bacteria on avian host fitness and the zoonotic potential of emerging Chlamydiales will help us to understand the implications of these infections for avian and human health.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/pathogens10080948
Field of Research 1107 Immunology
1108 Medical Microbiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30154247

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.