Bird feeding in urban wetlands: assessing the effectiveness of educational messages on attitudes towards feeding. A case study at Sanctuary Lakes

Henson, Ella 2021, Bird feeding in urban wetlands: assessing the effectiveness of educational messages on attitudes towards feeding. A case study at Sanctuary Lakes, B. Environmental Science (Hons) thesis, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University.

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Title Bird feeding in urban wetlands: assessing the effectiveness of educational messages on attitudes towards feeding. A case study at Sanctuary Lakes
Author Henson, Ella
Institution Deakin University
School School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Faculty Faculty of Science, Engineering and Built Environment
Degree type Honours
Degree name B. Environmental Science (Hons)
Thesis advisor Miller KellyORCID iD for Miller Kelly orcid.org/0000-0003-4360-6232
Date submitted 2021
Summary Despite being widely discouraged, feeding of wild birds occurs frequently in Australia. This study explored the associations between normative beliefs and attitudes of people on bird feeding behaviour and examined how four educational messages changed attitudes towards waterbird feeding at Sanctuary Lakes, near Melbourne, Australia (37.8963° S, 144.7616° E). An online survey of nearby residents (n = 206) identified those who have fed waterbirds at Sanctuary Lakes at least once in the past two years (feeders; 22.8%) and those who have not (non-feeders). Participants viewed one of four randomly selected educational messages and were asked to state their level of agreement to two statements; (1) People should be able to feed waterbirds if they want to; (2) It is acceptable to feed waterbirds at Sanctuary Lakes, before and after exposure to these messages. While some messages appeared to evoke a small shift towards the belief that people should not feed waterbirds, no message was unambiguously more effective than any other. Feeders exhibited different social norms around waterbird feeding compared with non-feeders. Results suggest that messages based on bird health and normative beliefs may be effective in discouraging waterbird feeding.

Language eng
Indigenous content off
Field of Research 3205 Medical biochemistry and metabolomics
Description of original 118 p.
Copyright notice ©All rights reserved
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30154700

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