Family Men and the Women They Murdered: A Critique of Popular Press Reporting of Three Crimes in Australia

Little, Janine 2021, Family Men and the Women They Murdered: A Critique of Popular Press Reporting of Three Crimes in Australia, Hecate: an interdisciplinary journal of women's liberation, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 1-22.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Family Men and the Women They Murdered: A Critique of Popular Press Reporting of Three Crimes in Australia
Formatted title Family Men and the Women They Murdered: A Critique of Popular Press Reporting of Three Crimes in Australia
Author(s) Little, JanineORCID iD for Little, Janine orcid.org/0000-0001-5419-9367
Journal name Hecate: an interdisciplinary journal of women's liberation
Volume number 46
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 22
Total pages 22
Publisher Hecate Press
Place of publication St. Lucia, QLD
Publication date 2021
ISSN 0311-4198
Keyword(s) Coercive Control
Family
Feminist Theory
Media Representation
Men's Violence Against Women
Women Murdered
Summary This essay targets a version of the “family man,” in media cultural representation, that serves patriarchal and capitalist interests as a gendered figure of social/structural support for violence against women. It reads three violent crimes where white middle-class men in conventional, ideated family roles murder the women who are either married to or estranged from them. I locate aspects of media coverage of the crimes that run contrary to a public narrative of outrage about “domestic” violence and “family” violence that feeds into a more general, neoliberal tendency of sounding progressive without being politically so, identified, among others, by Faith Agostinone-Wilson in 2020. Analysis of media texts shows that concerted efforts to identify multi-faceted expressions of men’s privilege are a way to resist even subtly naturalised forms of men’s violence against women. Extreme and lethal instances of this violence (as victims’ “family” experience) are reported ever more frequently. The project of insisting on the implicit connections between notions of white middle-class normalcy and the stereotypical family to structurally supported, gendered violence is reaffirmed as necessarily disruptive.
Language eng
Field of Research 1904 Performing Arts and Creative Writing
2005 Literary Studies
2103 Historical Studies
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30154874

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Communication and Creative Arts
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 6 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Sat, 28 Aug 2021, 07:42:33 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.