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Evolutionary dynamics and epidemiology of endemic and emerging coronaviruses in humans, domestic animals, and wildlife

Islam, Ariful, Ferdous, J, Islam, S, Sayeed, MA, Dutta Choudhury, S, Saha, O, Hassan, MM and Shirin, T 2021, Evolutionary dynamics and epidemiology of endemic and emerging coronaviruses in humans, domestic animals, and wildlife, Viruses, vol. 13, no. 10, Special Issue Emergence and Evolution of the SARS-CoV-2 and Other Coronaviruses, pp. 1-27, doi: 10.3390/v13101908.

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Title Evolutionary dynamics and epidemiology of endemic and emerging coronaviruses in humans, domestic animals, and wildlife
Author(s) Islam, ArifulORCID iD for Islam, Ariful orcid.org/0000-0002-9210-3351
Ferdous, J
Islam, S
Sayeed, MA
Dutta Choudhury, S
Saha, O
Hassan, MM
Shirin, T
Journal name Viruses
Volume number 13
Issue number 10
Season Special Issue Emergence and Evolution of the SARS-CoV-2 and Other Coronaviruses
Article ID 1908
Start page 1
End page 27
Total pages 27
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2021
ISSN 1999-4915
Summary Diverse coronavirus (CoV) strains can infect both humans and animals and produce various diseases. CoVs have caused three epidemics and pandemics in the last two decades, and caused a severe impact on public health and the global economy. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to understand the emergence and evolution of endemic and emerging CoV diversity in humans and animals. For diverse bird species, the Infectious Bronchitis Virus is a significant one, whereas feline enteric and canine coronavirus, recombined to produce feline infectious peritonitis virus, infects wild cats. Bovine and canine CoVs have ancestral relationships, while porcine CoVs, especially SADS-CoV, can cross species barriers. Bats are considered as the natural host of diverse strains of alpha and beta coronaviruses. Though MERS-CoV is significant for both camels and humans, humans are nonetheless affected more severely. MERS-CoV cases have been reported mainly in the Arabic peninsula since 2012. To date, seven CoV strains have infected humans, all descended from animals. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses (SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2) are presumed to be originated in Rhinolopoid bats that severely infect humans with spillover to multiple domestic and wild animals. Emerging alpha and delta variants of SARS-CoV-2 were detected in pets and wild animals. Still, the intermediate hosts and all susceptible animal species remain unknown. SARS-CoV-2 might not be the last CoV to cross the species barrier. Hence, we recommend developing a universal CoV vaccine for humans so that any future outbreak can be prevented effectively. Furthermore, a One Health approach coronavirus surveillance should be implemented at human-animal interfaces to detect novel coronaviruses before emerging to humans and to prevent future epidemics and pandemics
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/v13101908
Field of Research 0605 Microbiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30156384

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.