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Three dimensions of scientific impact

journal contribution
posted on 2020-06-23, 00:00 authored by Grzegorz Siudem, Barbara Żogała-Siudem, Anna Cena, Marek GagolewskiMarek Gagolewski
The growing popularity of bibliometric indexes (whose most famous example is the h index by J. E. Hirsch [J. E. Hirsch, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 16569–16572 (2005)]) is opposed by those claiming that one’s scientific impact cannot be reduced to a single number. Some even believe that our complex reality fails to submit to any quantitative description. We argue that neither of the two controversial extremes is true. By assuming that some citations are distributed according to the rich get richer rule (success breeds success, preferential attachment) while some others are assigned totally at random (all in all, a paper needs a bibliography), we have crafted a model that accurately summarizes citation records with merely three easily interpretable parameters: productivity, total impact, and how lucky an author has been so far.

History

Journal

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Volume

117

Issue

25

Pagination

13896 - 13900

Publisher

National Academy of Sciences

Location

Washington, D.C.

ISSN

0027-8424

eISSN

1091-6490

Language

eng

Publication classification

C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal

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